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Education

Applicant: Mari MacFarland

  1. Title: SVSU BRAIN (Bay-area, Great Lakes, Midland, Research in Autism, Intellectual Disability, and Neurological Disorders) Center
  2. Period of Study: January 2020 - December 2020
  3. Proposal Abstract: The current application is a continuation project that evolved from the previously funded SVSU Autism Research Lab application. Since Spring 2019, we have supported the growth of new programs (i.e., Cardinal-to-Cardinal), supported growing programs (i.e., Think Cardinal), engaged community partners (i.e., Saginaw ISD) and partnered with registered student organizations (i.e., Cardinals for Special Olympics). We are also providing intensive training and hands-on experience to research assistants employed by the BRAIN Center, with the generous support of the UGRP grant. As such, the current application proposes the continued development and growth of the SVSU BRAIN Center, which is dedicated to the analysis of evidence-based interventions for the benefit of individuals with ASD, intellectual disability, and neurological disorders. Service providers require specialized preparation to effectively support students with high intensity needs (Adera & Bullock, 2009; Conley & You, 2016). Of primary concern are those who support students with emotional and behavioral challenges, particularly those diagnosed with ASD, intellectual, and other developmental disabilities (Boe et al., 1997; George et al., 1995; Billingsley, 2004b; Kaff, 2004). Social issues are one of the most common symptoms for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; American Psychological Association, 2013), intellectual, and developmental disabilities. Some individuals with disabilities are sensitive to being touched and may not wish to shake hands or hug others (American Psychological Association, 2013). Others experience challenges with turn taking and sharing, showing or talking about their emotions, and perspective-taking (Baron-Cohen, 1992; Dennis, Lazenby, & Lockyear, 2001). People with ASD and other disabilities may also experience anxiety and depression (Bellini, 2006). These symptoms can compromise social competence, potentially leading to isolation. Numerous social skills interventions target individuals with disabilities, but only those shown to be effective through scientific analysis are considered evidenced-based (Horner et al., 2005)

Applicant: Mari MacFarland

  1. Title: SVSU BRAIN Center
  2. Department of Study: Teacher Education-Elementary/Early Childhood/Special Education
  3. Submitted: October 2018
  4. Proposal Abstract: The current application is a continuation project that evolved from the previously funded SVSU Autism Research Lab application. Since Spring 2018, in addition to changing the name of the project to the BRAIN (Bay-area, Midland, Saginaw Research in Autism, Intellectual Disability, and Neurological Disorders) Center, we have implemented new programs (i.e., Cardinal-to-Cardinal), supported growing programs (i.e., Think Cardinal), engaged community partners (i.e., Saginaw ISD) and partnered with registered student organizations (i.e., Cardinals for Special Olympics). We are also providing intensive training and hands-on experience to research assistants employed by the BRAIN Center, with the generous support of the UGRP grant. As such, the current application proposes the continued development and growth of the SVSU BRAIN Center, which is dedicated to the analysis of evidence-based interventions for the benefit of individuals with ASD, intellectual disability, and neurological disorders.

    Service providers require specialized preparation to effectively support students with high intensity needs (Adera & Bullock, 2009; Conley & You, 2016). Of primary concern are those who support students with emotional and behavioral challenges, particularly those diagnosed with ASD, intellectual, and other developmental disabilities (Boe et al., 1997; George et al., 1995; Billingsley, 2004b; Kaff, 2004). Social issues are one of the most common symptoms for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; American Psychological Association, 2013), intellectual, and developmental disabilities. Some individuals with disabilities are sensitive to being touched and may not wish to shake hands or hug others (American Psychological Association, 2013). Others experience challenges with turn taking and sharing, showing or talking about their emotions, and perspective-taking (Baron-Cohen, 1992; Dennis, Lazenby, & Lockyear, 2001). People with ASD and other disabilities may also experience anxiety and depression (Bellini, 2006). These symptoms can compromise social competence, potentially leading to isolation. Numerous social skills interventions target individuals with disabilities, but only those shown to be effective through scientific analysis are considered evidenced-based (Horner et al., 2005).

Applicant:  Mari MacFarland

  1. Title: SVSU Autism Research Lab
  2. Department of Study: Teacher Education-Elementary/Early Childhood/Special Education
  3. Submitted: March 2018
  4. Proposal Abstract: Social issues are one of the most common symptoms for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; American Psychological Association, 2013). Some individuals with ASD are sensitive to being touched and may not wish to shake hands or hug others (American Psychological Association, 2013). Others experience challenges with turn taking and sharing, showing or talking about their emotions, and perspective-taking (Baron-Cohen, 1992; Dennis, Lazenby, & Lockyear, 2001). Individuals with ASD may demonstrate self-stimulatory behaviors (e.g., moving fingers in front of eyes) and difficulty with voice modulation (e.g., intonation, volume; Happe, 1993; Shriberg et al, 2001). People with ASD may also experience anxiety and depression (Bellini, 2006). These symptoms can compromise social competence, potentially leading to isolation. Numerous social skills interventions target individuals with ASD, but only those shown to be effective through scientific analysis are considered evidenced-based (Horner et al., 2005). The current application proposes the formation of the SVSU Autism Research Lab dedicated to the analysis of evidence-based interventions for the benefit of individuals with ASD.

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Interim Director Undergraduate Research

Brian Thomas

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