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Poster Presentations

3277 | Tyler Saez, Holly Bill, Tom Dillon, Quentin Jezewski

tjsaez@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name: Ranjana Dutta
Department: Psychology
College: Arts and Behavorial Sciences
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
Get it over with! Insufficient Effort on a Procrastination Survey in the U.S. and China
 

Procrastination research relies on undergraduates' self-reports from online surveys. Recent research with insufficient effort responders (IERs) shows that even a small percentage of inattentiveness may have harmful effects on means, structural, and psychometric results of studies. Given shared traits between procrastinators and IERs (e.g., distractibility), it is imperative to study how these two concepts relate.

In this study, we examine (a) the prevalence of IERs in an online survey of procrastination, (b) the differences in means and alpha reliability of a scale of procrastination, (c) whether IERs see themselves as procrastinators, and (d) US and China differences.

Undergraduates from the Midwestern US (n = 810) and Guangdong region of China (n = 570) responded to a survey that included the Irrational Procrastination Scale (IPS;’ Steele, 2010). The survey also included three directed-response items and a self-reported diligence measure (0 = minimal effort; 3 = very diligently) in addition to average time per question and instances of straight lining provided by SurveyGizmo.

164 participants were identified as IERs (US = 86, 10.6%; China = 78, 13.5%). The IER group straight lined significantly more in both countries. The means on IPS were similar, but alpha reliabilities were significantly lower for the IER group in both countries. The IERs also had a lower GPA (significant in U.S.) but identified less as procrastinators (significant in U.S.) suggesting strategic carelessness from self-identified non-procrastinators.

References

Steel, P. (2010). Arousal, avoidant and decisional procrastinators: Do they exist? Personality and Individual Differences, 48, 926–934. doi:10.1016/j.paid.2010.02.025

 

 
 

3284 | Sydney Gainforth

smgainfo@svsu.edu

Faculty Mentor:Julie Commerford

Department:Geography
College:Arts and Behavorial Sciences
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc):UGRP
 

Analyzing the Impacts of Humans and Climate on Temperate Forest Plants (3,873KB)  

Audio Reflection

 

Analyzing the Impacts of Humans and Climate on Temperate Forest Plants 

Pollen can be used in many ways, such as solving crimes or recreating past landscapes. Through analyzing 46 pollen samples that were extracted from Avery Lake, Illinois, we can see what life was like at different times at this location. This site is situated near Kincaid Mounds, which is the location of the historic Mississippian people. Time periods that were examined include the Little Ice Age (LIA), that took place from about 1300AD- 1800AD, and the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), that took place from about 950AD-1250AD. By performing an analysis of variance (ANOVA) on the pollen counts for Hickory (Carya spp.) trees, I revealed that their presence at Avery Lake is driven by human activity, but unchanged during the LIA and MCA. Additionally, at the other end of the spectrum, the presence of Pine (Pinus spp.) trees at the site was directly driven by the climate and unimpacted by humans. Overall, arboreal pollen increases when humans are absent and non-arboreal pollen increases when humans are present.

 

Analyzing the Impacts of Humans and Climate on Temperate Forest Plants Poster

 

3295 | Kelsey Lewis

kjlewis1@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentors: Dr. Dennis Gray, Dr. Jay Scott, Dr. Cal Borden
Department: Biology
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): Student-Led UGRP
 
Does Methylbutenol Confer Thermal Tolerance to Emitting Plants?
 
Photosynthesis is the most important means by which plants contribute to our world. Though important, photosynthesis is a delicate process that can experience damage from environmental stresses including light and temperature. Excessive light can result in damage by causing the production of reactive oxygen species. Extreme temperatures, on the other hand, affect the functionality of photosynthesis by altering the fluidity of a plant’s membranes. For most plants, adaptation of the membranes’ fluidity is easily accomplished. However, pines native to mountainous regions in the western U.S. experience rapid, extreme temperature fluctuations that membranes are unable to appropriately adjust to. There is growing evidence that volatile organic compounds, such as isoprene and methylbutenol (MBO), may provide thermal protection to emitting species. For this project, I will explore the purpose of MBO emission by measuring the response of plants to heat stress in both the presence and absence of MBO. The results of this project will aid me in determining if MBO provides thermal tolerance to emitting species, thereby significantly increasing our understanding of why some plants emit this costly compound.
 
 

3318 | Anil Sah

Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Rajani Muraleedharan
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
Agricultural Monitoring using an Unmanned Arial Vehicle (UAV)
 

Ensuring the health, production, and management of crops has been one of the challenging issues due to ongoing climate change and the continuous rise in the population. In an article by the national geographic magazine, it has been estimated that by 2050, the world’s population will reach approximately 9 billion, which will lead to an increase of food demand by 70% and less arable land will be available for agricultural practices. The proposed prototype could help in crop management using an agricultural unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The UAV can also help to map the land, sense the sounding environment, adjust harvesting time, and ensure optimal growth of crops. It can also allow for farm predator analysis to determine how the crop is being attacked by larger animals. Sensors like location-based sensors (GPS, ultrasonic), barometric, temperature, humidity sensors, and optical sensors (RGB, NIR) would be used to fulfill these tasks. The cost-efficient agricultural UAV will make farmers save labor costs and increase productivity.

 

3321 | Kaitlyn Pierce

Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Coote
Department: Chemistry
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
 
 
Antifungal Assessment of a Novel Ruthenium Hydroxamate
 

Invasive, pathogenic fungi pose a significant health challenge, especially among those with weakened immunity. As fungal resistance develops to conventional therapies, new compounds are being sought to act as fungicides. Hydroxamates coordinated to ruthenium have been investigated as antimicrobial and anticancer agents. A novel ruthenium-based hydroxamate produced by the Warhausen group of SVSU was evaluated against S. cerevisiae. The ligated complex showed no inhibition of growth whereas the free hydroxamate inhibited growth.

 

3322 | Dani Toth

Faculty Mentor's Name: Julie Lynch
Psychology
Arts and Behavorial Sciences
UGRP
 
"Let's Just Call This Done": Examining College Students' Writing Revisions

Writing generally involves three interleaved processes: planning, text generation, and revision (Hayes & Flower, 1987). Many college-level writers find revision particularly challenging, although it is essential to high quality writing (Butterfield, et al., 1996). The purpose of this project is to examine the development of college students’ revision processes in depth.

The participants were 29 students at a regional, comprehensive university. Sixteen were beginning writers (having no more than one college-level writing class), and thirteen were advanced writers (either seniors or employed as writing tutors). Each completed three sessions in which they planned a persuasive essay on a given topic, wrote the essay, and revised the essay. They were instructed to do all of their writing on a computer and think aloud while they were writing. The students’ verbalizations and actions on the screen were recorded. These think aloud protocols were transcribed verbatim. Before writing, the participants filled out a survey regarding their attitudes about writing and their general writing practices. After writing, the participants answered several questions about the processes they used to write within this study.

Our preliminary results indicate that college writers tend to make more revisions involving mechanics (i.e., grammar, punctuation, wording changes) than revisions involving meaning. These results were expected given past research (Adams, et al., 2010), and this trend was stronger for beginning writers than advanced writers.

We are now conducting analyses to “dig deeper” into when and how students revise their writing. Two raters have coded the participants’ think aloud protocols using categories such as reading the draft, verbalizations about content, and verbalizations about strategies. Advanced writers made more revisions overall and more comments while thinking aloud about these revisions. Particularly, advanced writers made more comments about specific revision strategies than beginning writers did. With few exceptions, the revisions students made and the way they thought aloud about these revisions were not correlated with their survey and interview answers. Thus, there is a discrepancy between their perceived writing practices and the actual revisions they made. We are currently conducting analyses to find out which revision practices predict the quality of the participants’ essays.

This multi-method approach will provide insight into the development of students’ cognitive processes while revising and, therefore, a better understanding of how best to support students in this challenging task.

Let's Just Call This Done Examining College Students' Writing Revisions

3324 | Stephen McGraw

Faculty Mentor's Name: Lincoln, MA, DPT, CSCS; Rowley, T, PhD; Berry, D, PhD, AT, ATC
Department: Kinesiology
College: Health and Human Services
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
Reliability of the Landmine One-repetition Maximum and Comparison Between Free-weight One-repetition Maximum: A Cross-sectional Repeated Measures Study Design Protocol
 

Background: Testing an individual’s one-repetition maximum (1RM) allows exercise professionals to determine maximal strength for a given muscle group(s). The current literature includes many studies that test 1RM via free-weight or machine-based movements. However, there is a paucity of literature examining 1RM via landmine exercises, including the landmine row (LR). Someone performing the LR pulls the free end of the barbell toward their torso, with the opposite end on the ground. Because the LR follows a curvilinear path, the user encounters a variable resistance pattern throughout the movement. Consequently, the actual load the user encounters must be determined using a load quantification procedure that allows for direct comparison between LR 1RM and free-weight row 1RM. Objective: To determine whether the LR 1RM assessment meets criteria for a reliable strength test. Methods: Thirty individuals will be recruited to participate in three testing sessions: (1) LR familiarization and free-weight row 1RM and (2) 1RM LR testing sessions. During LR 1RM testing, the angle of the barbell will be measured at the top and bottom positions via a phone goniometry application. Data will be analyzed via intraclass correlation coefficients (2,1), coefficient of variation, paired t-test with effect size, and standard error of measurement. Discussion: The results of this study will inform a recommendation on whether 1RM assessments are reliable for LR exercises. If 1RM assessments are determined to be reliable for the LR, practitioners can prescribe exercise using a percentage of 1RM. Furthermore, future researchers can investigate other landmine exercises for 1RM reliability.

3329 | Chad Pocock, Hunter Grunwell, Dani Toth

Faculty Mentor's Name: Julie Lynch
Department: Psychology
College: Arts and Behavorial Sciences
 
Distractions, Self-Regulation, and Writing Processes

Throughout the writing process, distractions can direct the attention of the writer away from the main task and use up the writer’s working memory resources. Although several studies have been conducted to test the effect distractions have on the writing process, the effect is not straightforward. For instance, sometimes distractions simply slow down writing but do not affect the quality of writing (Ransdell et al., 2002). The purpose of this project is to address a gap in literature regarding the impact of distractions on the writing process as well as determine how working memory and self-regulation techniques factor into the quality of writing when distractions are present.

To date, 35 participants have been recruited from a regional, public university. They participated via a video-conference platform and their on-screen writing was recorded. The participants were instructed to complete a short essay requiring only general knowledge. They wrote under one of three conditions: baseline (no planned interruptions), controlled (planned interruptions that can be attended to when the participant chooses), and uncontrolled (planned interruptions that will require an immediate response). The planned interruptions were a series of questions which provided insight on how many other distractions the participants had while writing and the nature of these distractions.

The participants completed a survey about self-regulation and a working memory measure, both of which were used to determine how these attributes, combined with the presence of distractions, influence writing. The amount and type of distractions encountered during writing provided by the surveys were also factored into analyses.

We anticipate that the uncontrolled condition, in which distractions are delivered and attended to immediately, would impair the fluency and quality of writing the most. In further data analyses, we will explore the impact of working memory and self-regulation through regression analyses. We hypothesize that both variables will predict students’ ability to successfully deal with distractions.

3332 | Paige Prime, Olivia Getzinger

prprime@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Coote
Department: Chemistry
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 
Biophysical interactions of a novel, multi-substituted beta-lactone antimicrobial

Antibiotic resistance poses a continuing threat to global health as pathogenic bacteria adopt defenses against conventional b-lactam based therapies, often by the expression of b-lactamase enzymes. Large molecule drugs such as obafluorin, oxazolomycin, and curromycin feature the β-lactone functional group and have been successfully employed as antibiotics but are challenging to synthesize or isolate from natural sources.

Synthesized easily from a ketene heterodimer, a novel, small molecule b-lactone, (3S,4Z)-4-[1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethylidene]-3-methyloxetan-2-one) shows antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive M. luteus, Gram-negative E. coli K-12, as well as the fungi S. cerevisiae and C. albicans in disk diffusion assays. Binding affinity of the compound to calf thymus DNA and bovine serum albumin were investigated to characterize interactions with biomolecules.

The broad-spectrum, intermediate intensity of action of the easily synthesized small molecule support further investigation toward identifying a mechanism of action and consideration of incorporating the b-lactone moiety into future antimicrobial agents.

 

Biophysical interactions of a novel, multi-substituted beta-lactone antimicrobial

3334 | Olivia Getzinger, Paige Prime

oagetzin@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Coote
Department: Chemistry
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 
Novel, multi-substituted -lactone shows broad-spectrum antifungal and antimicrobial activity
 

Pathogenic fungi continue to develop resistance to fungicidal/fungistatic compounds and pose a significant risk to immune compromised patients. Traditional fungicides are based on azole functional groups or complex polyenes and echinocandins all of which have encountered some resistance resulting in a shortage of new, effective treatments. While occurring in some known fungicidal agents, the b-lactone group has not been prominent.

Synthesized easily from a ketene heterodimer, a novel, small molecule b-lactone, (3S,4Z)-4-[1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethylidene]-3-methyloxetan-2-one) shows antifungal activity against S. cerevisiae and C. albicans as well as antibacterial activity against Gram-positive M. luteus and Gram-negative E. coli K-12 in disk diffusion tests. The mechanism of action remains unknown, but it is proposed that the compound may act against the cell wall based on a sorbitol assay.

The broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties of this compound suggest that the b-lactone functional group is worth further consideration as a focal point in the development of new therapeutics.

 

Novel, multi-substituted -lactone shows broad-spectrum antifungal and antimicrobial activity

3335 | Nixon, Katie

Faculty Mentor's Name:
Lincoln, MA, DPT, CSCS, Rowley, T, PhD, and Berry, D, PhD, AT, ATC
Department: Kinesiology
College: Health and Human Services
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
The Validity and Reliability of Estimation of Repetitions to Failure Across The Level of Effort Spectrum: A Cross-Sectional Repeated Measures Study Design Protocol
 

Background:  Estimation of repetitions-to-failure is a subjective report of how many repetitions the exerciser feels they can perform during a resistance training exercise, which is valuable for informing flexible training programs.  When close to failure, exercisers using machines can accurately estimate their repetitions-to-failure, while it is unknown if exercisers using less constrained conditions can.

Objective: Our aim is to report the validity and reliability of estimating repetitions to failure for a rowing exercise. 

Methods: Thirty healthy, recreationally trained, 18–45-year-old SVSU students, will be recruited for a repeated measures study. Participants will familiarize themselves with the Landmine T-Bar Row during the first meeting. On two accounts, they will complete two exercise sets with the landmine T-bar row. Sufficient weight will be loaded (and remain consistent), and the participant will perform adequate repetitions to bring them to failure each set. The participant will pause after each repetition and will be asked “How many repetitions do you have left?” Data will be recorded and analyzed via calculation of actual error, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC: 2,1), and coefficient of variation for each repetition leading up to failure.  

Discussion: Since our study will assess validity and reliability of estimation of repetitions to failure across the entire set of exercise, the findings will assist practitioners to identify the usefulness of these scales in practice at varying proximities to failure.

3338 | Rachel Laskowski, Emily Holup

Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Jennifer Chaytor
Department: Chemistry
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
Agricultural Monitoring using an Unmanned Ariel Vehicle (UAV)Synthesis of an aryl-C-Glycoside as Potential Treatment for Type II Diabetes 

Type II diabetes mellitus is a significant health problem worldwide that is largely characterized by hyperglycemia, which can lead to a variety of other diseases. Most patients require drug therapy in addition to lifestyle changes to fully manage hyperglycemia. C-glycosides and O-glycosides have been used as alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors to lower blood glucose levels. Our laboratory is examining the synthesis of C-glycosides as potential compounds for treatment of type II diabetes. C-glycosides were chosen as the focus due to their potential as selective SGLT2 inhibitors and their metabolic stability compared to O-glycosides. It is hypothesized that the compounds synthesized could potentially act as both alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and SGLT2 inhibitors. We are currently trying to obtain a specific target glycoside via two synthetic pathways. The first synthetic pathway relies on the Suzuki coupling of a vinyl triflate intermediate to an aromatic group as the key step to produce aryl-C-glycosides. The second builds the aryl-C-glycoside via a silyl enol ether intermediate and completes the synthesis by performing a Wittig reaction on the resulting ketone. Analysis of spectra obtained through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy is used to ensure that the intended product is formed at each step. This presentation will discuss the synthetic pathways followed to produce the target C-glycoside.

3342 | Margaret Wood, Shariful Alam Robin

Faculty Mentor's Name: A K M Monayem H. Mazumder
Department: Mechanical Engineering
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 
Performance of a Multistage Electrohydrodynamic Gas Pump in a Square Channel

Ensuring the health, production, and management of crops has been one of the challenging issues due to ongoing climate change and the continuous rise in the population. In an article by the national geographic magazine, it has been estimated that by 2050, the world’s population will reach approximately 9 billion, which will lead to an increase of food demand by 70% and less arable land will be available for agricultural practices. The proposed prototype could help in crop management using an agricultural unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The UAV can also help to map the land, sense the sounding environment, adjust harvesting time, and ensure optimal growth of crops. It can also allow for farm predator analysis to determine how the crop is being attacked by larger animals. Sensors like location-based sensors (GPS, ultrasonic), barometric, temperature, humidity sensors, and optical sensors (RGB, NIR) would be used to fulfill these tasks. The cost-efficient agricultural UAV will make farmers save labor costs and increase productivity.

3361 | Brianna Vanderstelt, Makiya Tunstull, Allison Booms, Wells Ling

Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Travis Pashak
Department: Psychology
College: Arts and Behavorial Sciences
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 
Factor Structure and Normative Update of the Brief Symptom Inventory in College Emerging Adults
 

In this study, we psychometrically evaluate the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), a relatively quick and user-friendly distress screener, and attempt to establish clinical cutoff scores that are appropriate for college-aged emerging adults. Because of the wide utility of distress screeners, it is important they undergo a psychometric evaluation to maximize their reliability and validity. Thus far, there are well-established BSI norms for both children and adults, however, the interpretation for emerging adults in college has remained uncertain.

To potentially fix this, we pooled together two datasets which were collected at the same Midwest university for a total of 725 respondents. Respondents were asked demographic questions such as their treatment status (current, past, or never) and were split into two groups of current/past treatment and never in treatment. After using Jacobson and Truax’s three formulas for identifying clinical significance, we propose Formula B’s 1.59 as an appropriate clinical cutoff score for emerging adults in college. From our analysis, it also appears that the BSI is best explained by the single factor structure as opposed to the initially proposed 9 symptom structure. This could suggest that the BSI measures general psychological distress rather than multidimensional symptoms.

By setting appropriate clinical cutoff scores for college-enrolled emerging adults, the BSI can be used as an assessment tool for distress screening. This is critical to therapists and counselors on college campuses as well as off college campuses, as they can better adapt their services to best fit the needs of emerging adults in college.

 

 

3360 | Allison Booms, Brianna Vanderstelt, Makiya Tunstull

Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Travis Pashak, Dr. Joseph Weaver
Department: Psychology
College: Arts and Behavorial Sciences
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 
 Measuring Internal Conflict with an Implicit Association Test of the Psychodynamic Structural Model
 
This proposal poster describes the design of a measure to investigate personality factors consistent with the psychoanalytic structural model, specifically with id and superego components of the model. We constructed a psychoanalytically oriented implicit association test (IAT) completed online using PsyToolkit survey software. The study includes administration of scales which we expect to have correlations with the IAT (aggression, hypersexuality, criminality, conscientiousness, perfectionism, and distress) in accordance with psychoanalytic literature. Participants will be approximately 150 undergraduate students recruited using the Psychology Research Participation System and emails. For incentive, participants can be entered into a raffle to win a gift card upon completion of the study. In the IAT, participants will sort words into their corresponding categories: “me,” “not me,” “instinct” (id), and “restraint” (superego), and combined categories. After completing the IAT, participants will complete associated scales, and anonymously enter their email for raffle entry. Given the nature of the measure, we hypothesize IAT scores will be positively correlated with aggression, hypersexuality, and criminality, and IAT scores will be negatively correlated with conscientiousness and perfectionism. Additionally, we hypothesize the absolute value of the IAT effect scores will be positively correlated with distress. To test our hypotheses, we will compute IAT effect scores and correlations between IAT effect scores and scale scores. We expect negative IAT scores to be indicative of greater id alignment and positive IAT scores to be indicative of greater superego alignment. We hope in this project to generate more empirical data on psychoanalytic ideas using our IAT.
 
 
 

3356 | Hien Nguyen, Rhossa Babelle Umutoniwase, Elizabeth Conklin

htnguyen@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name:Dr. Kyle Cissell
Department: Chemistry
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 
Assessment of Staphylococcus Epidermidis Biofilm Inhibition Using Essential Oils
 
Our skin is a host to many harmless microorganisms. Among these is Staphylococcus epidermidis. This bacterium, although harmless to our epithelia, is an opportunistic pathogen when entering the bloodstream. Due to S. epidermidis’ prevalence, and the fact that it readily forms biofilms, its potential as an infectious agent is high among patients with pre-existing ailments. As we have previously found in UGRP- funded projects, essential oils are effective antibacterial agents. However, their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation is an area that requires attention. In this project, S. epidermidis was cultured and further grown on plasma-treated polystyrene surfaces to form biofilms, whose growth was confirmed with crystal violet staining. To assess biofilm growth inhibition, the polystyrene surfaces will be treated with readily available Lemongrass, Clove Bud, and Cinnamon Leaf essential oils. Future experiments will involve genetic profiling of biofilm-forming vs. non-biofilm forming bacteria using droplet-digital Polymerase Chain Reaction (ddPCR). The targeted genes for the genetic profiling studies will be from the intracellular adhesion (ica) locus, which is responsible for biofilm formation. Results from this work have the potential to aid in prevention of biofilm formation. For this presentation, results related to biofilm growth optimization, as well as essential oil-mediated growth inhibition studies, will be presented.
 
 
 

3359 | Sheldon Wheeler Jr

Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Merrick Lincoln
Department: Kinesiology
College: Health and Human Services
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): Strength, Conditioning, and Biomechanics Lab
 
Comparison Between Safety Squat Bar and Traditional Barbell Squats: A Brief Review
 

The squat exercise is used in training to strengthen muscles that extend the hips, knees, and ankles. The safety squat bar squat is a variation that uses a unique barbell design, including neck and shoulder padding, handles on the front of the bar, and a cambered, or offset placement of the weight plat]es To describe how the biomechanics features of safety squat bar squats compare to traditional barbell back squats. Specifically, we sought to summarize comparisons of forces, joint movement, and muscle activity to inform recommendations to practitioners regarding exercise- and equipment selection. We conducted searches through four databases: Pubmed/MEDLINE, Google Scholar, SPORTDiscus, and CINAHL for relevant studies.Three prior studies reported comparisons between repetition maximum (RM), joint movement, and muscle activity via surface electromyography between the barbell back squat and safety squat bar. We extracted methodology decisions and findings to inform broad comparisons between the squat exercise when performed with the two different barbells. Compared to back squat, the safety squat bar shows lower RM weights and decreased hip-, trunk-, and ankle flexion angles. Muscle activity in the lower body is similar; however, safety squat bar results in higher activity in the lower trapezius and lower activity of the rectus abdominis.The safety squat bar squat may be more appropriate than the traditional barbell squat for athletes with certain limitations, but practitioners should be cautious about exclusive use of the safety squat bar for maximum strength training is desired

 

 

3355 | Jonathan Giglio

Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Cissell
Department: Chemistry
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 
Identification and Quantitation of Active Ingredients Responsible for the Antibacterial Behavior of Essential Oils
 
Staphylococcus epidermidis, a common bacterium found on the human epithelia, is considered an opportunistic pathogen. It is especially problematic for immunocompromised individuals in hospital settings, where most S. epidermidis infections occur. Essential oils have long been used as treatments for various ailments, displaying antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties. The uncertainty of the concentration of active ingredients from bottle to bottle have made it difficult to accurately determine the amount of essential oil needed to inhibit bacterial growth. Additionally, due to differences in extraction protocols from one essential oil brand to another, identifying the active ingredients responsible for the antibacterial activity, and their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC), is essential. This study aims to quantitate and determine these essential oil active ingredients involved in S. epidermidis antibacterial activity. To this end, Lemongrass, Clove Bud, and Cinnamon Leaf essential oils were tested for antibacterial activity by performing Kirby-Bauer Disk Diffusion assays; and a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) was employed for identification and quantitation of the active ingredients. It was determined that Clove, Lemongrass, and Cinnamon oils all inhibited bacterial growth, with eugenol, citral, and cinnamaldehyde being the main active ingredients involved in antibacterial behavior. Results for the Kirby-Bauer tests, MICs, as well as quantitative amounts of active ingredients in essential oils will be presented.
 

3366 | Kimberly Moelker

klmoelke@svsu.edu

Faculty Mentor's Name: Lincoln, MA, DPT, CSCS, Rowley, T, PhD, and Berry, D, PhD, AT, ATC
Department: Kinesiology
College: Health and Human Services
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
The Reliability and Validity of Velocity-based Prediction of 1-Repetition Maximum for the Pendlay Row Exercise: A Cross-Sectional Repeated Measures Study Design Protocol
 

Background: Velocity-based data is increasingly used in resistance training. Velocity data allows practitioners to estimate one-repetition maximum (1RM) and assign appropriate exercise to physically active individuals. Determining 1RM is based on the force-velocity relationship, which describes the inverse relationship between concentric muscle force and the velocity of the movement. Estimation of 1RM can be found using the multi-point method, using four separate repetition velocities from four different submaximal loads via linear regression. The Pendlay Row is a common exercise for strength and sports-performance not yet analyzed by previous velocity-based literature. Objective: To describe the reliability and validity of the multipoint method for estimating the 1RM for the Pendlay Row. Methods: We will recruit 30 healthy male and females (ages 18-45) with a minimum one-year resistance training experience. Participants will be familiarized with the Pendlay Row and have actual 1RM tested during the first session. On two subsequent sessions, the velocity of the barbell will be measured using a Tendo linear position encoder during the Pendlay Row with 40%, 55%, 70% and 85% of participant’s 1RM. Multi-point velocity-based 1RM estimates will be compared to the actual 1RM, and reliability of findings will be described via test-retest coefficients of variation and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC: 2,1). Clinical Application: In practice, direct 1RM testing is not always practical. Efficient and accurate estimation methods are desirable. If shown to be valid and reliable, the multipoint method may be recommended to practitioners to monitor athlete-performance and inform precise prescription of exercise intensity.

 

 

3367 | Morgan Pfau, Mohammed Alabbas, Eric Fischhaber, Garret Ray, Jeffrey Bolday

Faculty Mentor's Name: Rajani Muraleedharan Sreekumarid
Department: Electrical Computer Engineering
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 

Environmental Monitoring Aquatic Drone

Team Members: Mohammad Abbas, Jeffery Bolday, Eric Fischhaber, Morgan Pfau, Garret Ray

Team Advisor: Dr. Rajani Muraleedharan

Abstract

The multitude of clean freshwater bodies in the state of Michigan are some of its defining characteristics. An effort must be made to keep these freshwater sources clean and to protect its habitats. The goal of this project was to make an easily controllable surface-level aquatic drone to help researchers and scientists study freshwater environments, while requiring minimal effort or human disturbance. The data collected includes pH, conductivity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen. The drone is capable of real-time testing and reporting of environmental data through 4G-LTE wireless communication between the drone and a user-end application. The data acquired from the drone would prove to be a boon to future scientists or researchers, being an overall benefit to the freshwater body being studied, thus contributing to the preservation of Michigan’s many aquatic ecosystems.

3363 | Makiya Tunstull, Brianna Vanderstelt, Allison Booms

mdtunstu@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name: Travis Pashak
Department: Psychology
College: Arts and Behavorial Sciences
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
Trauma Resilience on Campus: The Moderating Effect of Developmental Assets on Trauma Exposure and Symptomatology

Developmental assets are a set of constructs which appear to help enhance important developmental and health outcomes. The framework includes internal and external characteristics and resources individuals have which together can help promote resilience and increase the likelihood that an individual will overcome adversity. A developmental asset framework was established for youth by the Search Institute in 1990 and since then, the downward extension of the framework to children has been explored. A framework of such for emerging adults in college has only recently become a topic for evaluation. In hopes of providing such a framework for those emerging adults in college, the 120-item College Assets Measurement Profile for Undergraduate Students (CAMPUS) was built in 2012 by Pashak and Scales.

College-enrolled emerging adults face unfamiliar challenges and are likely to experience instability and demographic shifting which can have an effect on their coping skills. These developmental assets in the CAMPUS instrument are cumulatively theorized to serve as a protective factor for college students in the relationship between trauma exposure and posttraumatic anxiety symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed data gathered in a larger, completed empirical study on emerging adults and resilience using Andrew Hayes’ SPSS macros and found both that the developmental assets were generally negatively correlated with posttrauma symptoms and more specifically that the global assets score served as a buffer. Data from this study leads to the conclusion that global scores on the CAMPUS instrument statistically significantly moderate the correlation between trauma exposure and resulting posttraumatic symptomatology.

 

3364 | Waliul Matin, Michael Morrison

Faculty Mentor's Name: Mohammad Ashraf Khan
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 
Thermoelectric and thermo-mechanical study of electronic interconnects with solders and solder pastes

With the advancement of technology, the world now relies on electronic systems more than ever before. Thanks to Moore’s law, the size of components in these systems are reducing every year. This has led to smaller and more efficient devices in all fields of science and technology. But even with modern advancements, the most common failure mode of electronic circuits still persists. One of the leading causes of electronic circuit failure is the deterioration of solder or solder paste contact points. This deterioration is most commonly caused by thermal stress due to power cycling and operation of these devices. The chip, as well as, the interconnects can generate heat during operation and can produce large temperature gradient resulting in increased thermal stress, specifically in hotspots. This research aims to study these aforementioned thermal effects on the solder paste contact points in Quilt Packaging and Thru Silicon Via structures via simulation. This simulation demonstrates structural deformation due to dielectric or resistive heating. With the available fatigue parameters for the solders, the reliability of the structure has been studied. The research further extends to study the effects of different solder paste compositions during these thermal cycles and aims to establish a dataset to aid in the selection of correct solder paste composition for any particular use case.

 

3351 | Jonathan Lillo

jclillo@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Warhausen
Department: Chemistry
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 
 
Synthesis, Characterization, and Electrochemical Investigation of Ruthenium-Salophen Complexes

The focus of this research project is to synthesize a series of Ruthenium-Salophen complexes. Once synthesized, these complexes will be characterized using methods which include but are not limited to NMR, IR, and mass spectrometry. Also, cyclic voltammetry (CV), a type of electrochemical technique, will be used to find the oxidation and reduction potentials of the ruthenium complex. Research will be primarily on the coordination mode of the ruthenium-based molecule and its impact on redox behavior.

 

3397 | Abbie Bauer, Devin Neumann

arbauer1@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Jennifer Chaytor
Department: Chemistry
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 
C-Glycosides Synthesis for Potential Type II Diabetes Treatments
 
Type II diabetes mellitus is a significant health problem that affects nearly 425 million people globally and is characterized by hyperglycemia, which can lead to many other serious diseases. While lifestyle changes can make diabetes more manageable, most people also require drug therapy to regulate their blood glucose levels. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have been used to reduce blood glucose levels in other prescription drugs. Both compounds contain O-glycosides or C-glycosides, but while O-glycosides are frequently metabolically unstable, C-glycosides are less prone to degradation and have the potential to be effective and selective SGLT2 inhibitors. This research project focuses on the synthesis of C-glycosides, rather than O-glycosides, as potential compounds for the treatment of type II diabetes that could function as both alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and SGLT2 inhibitors. A single synthetic pathway is currently being explored to prepare a library of C-glycoside derivatives. A prepared C-glycoside is connected to an aryl group with varying functional groups attached in a three-step synthesis. The products of these reactions are purified using extraction techniques and column chromatography. Analysis of spectra obtained through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy is used to ensure that the intended product is present. Once synthesized, the library of derivatives will be tested for alpha-glucosidase and sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibition ability. This presentation will discuss the synthesis of the target C-glycosides.
 
 
 

3398 | Alice Erman, Emily Jaremba

Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Adam Warhausen
Department: Chemistry
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
 
Synthesis, Characterization, and Electrochemical Analysis of Synthetic Biomolecule Models Containing Ruthenium Metal with Hydroxamate and/or Nitrosyl Ligands
 
In the field of chemistry, the interactions between biological compounds, such as the heme unit, and nitric oxide (NO) are thoroughly studied and researched. However, there is much more to be learned from molecules that have the ability to generate NO within a biological system. One such NO donor is hydroxamic acid – a compound utilized in the pharmaceutical industry. This project studies the interactions between molecules that donate nitric oxide, and synthetic ruthenium-metal based models of the heme unit. The focus of this research is to understand the redox behavior of the reactions between these compounds through the use of electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical techniques. It is important to understand and learn more about the interactions between organic nitric oxide-donating molecules and heme-containing biomolecules due to their abundance in biological structures. Additionally, this project may potentially provide insight to unknown side-effects of hydroxamic acid-containing medications.
 
 
 

3326 | Levi Ricky, Sawyer Messing, Vincent Cirilo, Niraj Adhikari

llricky@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Rajani Muraleedharan Sreekhumarid
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
Project SPICEVC
 

Picture this. You’re driving your fairly new electric vehicle to SVSU. You realize along the way that you forgot to charge your car the night before and the battery is running awfully low. You had plans to go to the store after work and now you’re worried it will be a close call making it home even. Luckily that’s not a concern with SVSU’s SPICEVC. You drive your vehicle into the space and before you even exit the car, the display on the carport and the monitor in the vehicle both light up green indicating the vehicle is charging. Hands free and hassle free. No need to plug the vehicle in (though you could if you wanted to). You return after a few hours to see the vehicle has 200 more miles and you can now travel anywhere you want. This is the goal of SPICEVC. The ease of hands-free vehicle charging, assisted with environmentally friendly solar power, and comforted with a rainproof cover overhead, making for the most effortless fuel stop ever.

As green energy becomes more important, the number of electric vehicles, or “EVs”, are increasing exponentially [1]. That is why this project is more relevant than ever. This research is on EV charging with the universal plug-in outlet using wireless induction charging and alternatively wired fast charging. This project is beneficial for providing empirical data on EV charging performance as well as information on cost, safety, structure, appearance, and implementation. Having solar panels will add green energy impact and assist in power input cost. The proposed charging station will be unique as there is very few companies that implement induction chargers for EVs.

Citation

[1] Global EV Outlook 2020, IEA, Paris, June 2020. Accessed on February 07, 2021. [online] https://www.iea.org/reports/global-ev-outlook-2020

 

3337 | Zachary Schwab

Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Evelyn D. Ravuri
Department: Geography
College: Arts and Behavorial Sciences
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
Measuring Changes in the Population and Built Environment of Saginaw County Before, During, and After the Great Recession of 2008
 

Gentrification is a phenomenon wherein a poor neighborhood or urban area is transformed into a wealthier area, normally by wealthier people moving into that area. Gentrification sometimes also results in the previous inhabitants being displaced by the new, wealthier people moving in. Saginaw, Michigan, has been experiencing some form of gentrification for decades. This project aims to understand the level of gentrification that Saginaw has undergone in the years of 2008 and 2019, as well as understand where Saginaw falls on the “spectrum” of gentrification.

To understand where Saginaw is in terms of gentrification, we designated several different classes of characteristics that were common to gentrified areas. We then used Google Street Imagery to go block-by-block through Saginaw, giving each street face a “Gentrification Score” based on the characteristics that we defined beforehand. Two different gentrification scores were given to each block, one for imagery from 2008-2012 (earliest available), and one for imagery from 2017-2019 (latest available). After giving each block a gentrification score for both the earliest and latest years available, we determined five different ranges of gentrification scores and used ArcGIS to map out the results. An analysis of the results shows that blocks within Saginaw that had been going through gentrification in the earlier years were normally still going through gentrification in 2017-2019, with a few outlier blocks that had only become more disinvested as time went on.

These results suggest that as a whole, Saginaw is still experiencing a high amount of gentrification, with some areas experiencing it more than others. As time goes on, Saginaw will more than likely continue to experience gentrification in most areas. Some amount of bias in each block score is unavoidable, however, Saginaw is clearly experiencing different levels of gentrification depending on where it is that one is looking.

Measuring Changes in the Population and Built Environment of Saginaw County

3401 | Alexander Smith, David Holm, Dylan Lightfoot, Mohammed Alotaibi

Faculty Mentor's Name: Rajani Muraleedharan Sreekumarid
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): Nexteer Automotive
 
 
C.V. Axle Shaft Boot Slip Detection System
 
The Nexteer Axle Shaft Validation group would like to find a solution to calculate the slippage between the rubber boot and the axle shaft during a cold start test, within a temperature-controlled environment, and to log the data. A PLC will be used to collect data and process the information from the input shaft encoder along with the new sensor data. The slippage between the axle shaft and axle boot will be calculated and displayed in real time on an HMI. The sensor selected should be able to measure consistently an angle error of less than ½ degree. The sensor needs to be validated with 100 hours in a cold chamber for measurement error and durability prior to implementing into a test stand. The measurements will be collected and post processed in order to prove the system functions as designed. Automating the measurement process will improve efficiency, minimize downtime, increase throughput and will be a considerable cost savings.
 

3370 | Lucas Valota, Alexander Sawdon, Michael Dewell, Bradly Albrant, Miguel De la cruz

lbvalota@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name: Rajani Muraleedharan
Department: Electrical engineering
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 

Design and Implementation of an Electrostatic Loudspeaker

Electrostatic Loudspeakers (ESLs) are an emerging technology developed by very few companies, that provides consumers an opportunity to enjoy reproduced sound with high fidelity and low distortion. Current ESL models are expensive and tend to break down in humidity and around foreign debris, such as dust or other particulates in the air. The prototype ESL design prototype aims to maintain a high standard of accuracy by providing the essence of live musical performance at home in a cost-effective manner while being easy to maintain. The prototype will be more popular with the public as it will add more room for personalization and customization, which is accomplished by using modular system design. This is accomplished by making the system more modular. Making this system modular allows for easier repairs, easier transportation, and small adjustments to speaker height. The system will be more accessible to the public as it will be constructed in a cost-effective manner lowering its overall cost using reliable and cost-efficient materials that require less labor for future wear and tear. This is done by using materials that are cheaper but just as reliable and easier to work with. Overall, changing the physical design and structure of the system will render a much more desirable product. The ESL prototype is an affordable product for any household entertainment system.

 

3377 | Caroline Sawatzki

cgsawatz@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Rajani Muraleedharan
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): ECE Department
 
Using Cost-Effective Robotics Kits in Engineering Education
 

The field of robotics is multidisciplinary, employing fundamental knowledge and building upon skills acquired in electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, and computer science courses. Hands-on engagement, which has become increasingly difficult to facilitate due to the COVID-19 pandemic, is an integral component of any comprehensive engineering education program. A project-based approach using low-cost, pre-made kits offers practical experience in teamwork and collaboration, system design and implementation, problem solving and refinement of interdisciplinary skillsets through projects that can be completed at home or in the classroom. Robotics instruction and experimentation provides a means to achieve robust interdisciplinary learning outcomes, facilitating long-term retention of engineering concepts by illustrating the connections between theory and practice. This paper aims to establish the need for design integration throughout the undergraduate curriculum, identify existing methodologies for design integration, and develop a practical model for instructional use of Arduino Engineering Kits to support design education in the SVSU Electrical Engineering program. The kit provides basic design instructions and programming guidance for three projects: a self-balancing motorcycle, a mobile rover, and a whiteboard drawing robot. Each project operates using an Arduino MKR1000 microcontroller. The foundational skill requirements and outcomes of each project will be evaluated and matched to desired instructional outcomes across courses in the Electrical Engineering curriculum. Through amalgamation of the cognate fields of electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, mechatronics and computer science, the curriculum design that emerges from this project will serve as a multidisciplinary educational tool. The deliverables of this project will include suggestions and supplemental materials developed to augment existing curriculum, identification of conceptual underpinnings of project outcomes, and ideas for community outreach and recruitment opportunities that highlight the offerings of the SVSU Electrical Engineering Program.

Index Terms: Engineering Education, Robotics, Arduino

3371 | Garret Ray

Dr. Sandun Kuruppu
Department: Electrical & Computer Engineering
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
Assessment of Asymmetric Sampling Delay in Per-Phase Current and Position in Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine Controls
 
This research is designed to observe and determine the effects of asymmetric sampling delay in per phase current feedback in three-phase Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines(PMSM). PMSM systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB and Simulink, and a physical experimental setup is made using two Texas Instruments PMSMs controlled by DRV8301 motor controller boards. The physical system is controlled using TI Code Composer Studio and ControlSUITE motor control software to implement Sensed Field-Oriented Control. Simulated results are obtained and compared to experimental results, including varying degrees of asymmetric per-phase feedback delay. The discrete-time variant of the Laplace Transform, known as the Starred Transform, is used to find the discrete-time transfer function representation of the system to better simulate and observe unique dynamics of the asymmetrically delayed system. The discrete-time transfer function is implemented in MATLAB to generate bode plots of the system at varying bandwidths and asymmetric per-phase delay. Results of the research include dynamic system analysis under varying delay, stability analysis, experimental verification of system stability, and step response graphs of systems under different asymmetric delay.

3379 | Cardinals Solution

Women of Colors Social Media, Allison Stein - Technical Writer, Joanna A. Senger - Graphic Design, Zach Sklener - Social Media/Photography 

Center for Community Engagement Volunteer App Interface, Zainab A. Alkhatem – UI Design, Logan LaBrake – UI Design, Kate Roberts – UI Design, Emily N. Schuette – UI Design, Zach Sklener – UI Design

Saginaw County Protect CoalitionSaginaw Awesome Activity Book,  Adam Matich - Logo & Brand Design, Eliza Kriz - Technical Writer , Elizabeth Getzinger - Designer Cover Text & Mazes, Zainab A. Labbad - Designer Coloring Pages, Matthew J. Massey - Illustrator

Problem Solving Maps - Math Workbook, Karlie MacKay – Math tutor, Khairiah Alfaraj - Graphic Design, Easton Moore - Graphic Designer

 
Faculty Mentor's Name: J. Blake Johnson, Brad Herzog, Danilo Sirias
Department: Art
College: Arts and Behavorial Sciences
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): SVSU Cardinal Solutions
 
"Let's Just Call This Done": Examining College Students' Writing Revisions

SVSU Cardinal Solutions is an interdisciplinary faculty/student team that works directly with local businesses and non-profits to develop marketing solutions. An interdisciplinary collaboration between Art, Technical Writing, Education, and Marketing, the program encourages students to take a leading role in communicating with directly with clients. This real life experience prepares students for their future careers.

 

 

3341 | Nathan Piwowarsi, Haley Nelson, Tess Martin, Jesse Sanchez

nmpiwowa@svsu.edu

Faculty Mentor's Name:Dr. Joseph Ofori Dankwa

Department: Management

College: College of Business

Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): Vitito
 
 
Community Workaholics 
 

This will be a presentation of the First Ward Fellows Jesse Sanchez and Tess Martin, in the form of a comic book that was created by a pair of Art 390 students depicting their lives. The comic book will be highlighting their career goals and their aspirations within the Saginaw Community.This is the culmination of work between students and professors in Business, Art, Theater, and Sociology (B.A.T.S Programs)

 

 

3350 | Demetria Simmons,  Arrow Smith, and Hannah Wickman

hewickma@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Ofori-Dankwa
Department: Business Leadership
College: College of Business
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): Vitito Fellows
 
Creating Connections
 
 
 
 

3343 | Samuel Johnson, Sydney Czyz

Faculty Mentor's Name: Dr. Joseph Ofori-Dankwa
Department: Programs of Distinction
College: College of Business
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): Vitito Global Leadership Institute
 
 

World Changers BATS Project Winter 2021

The Winter 2021 BATS Project brings together a variety of students from four different disciplines - business, arts, theater, and sociology. Three teams, the Vitito Fellows, First Ward Fellows, and the Art 390 students, have come together and formed one team, the World Changers, to accomplish three primary deliverables. First is our Community Deliverable wherein the Vitito Fellows and First Ward Fellows research and apply to board positions within Saginaw City and Saginaw Township where they can affect community change. Additionally, as part of this deliverable the Vitito and First Ward Fellows hold a community focus group meeting to pose questions and facilitate discussion in developing several suggestions and or issues relating to the boards and commissions we researched. Second is our Comic Deliverable where all three teams collaborate throughout the semester to develop and print a 48-page comic book showcasing the community visions of the First Ward Fellows. Finally, our third deliverable is that of our final presentation in the SVSU Student Showcase where we present the work we have done together this semester and what we, as the World Changers, have been able to accomplish through hard work, creativity, and leadership.

 

 

3344 | Zachary Podojak, MacKenzie DuRussel, Alexander Dysinger, Riley Vasold, Ahmed Alturki

zjpodoja@svsu.edu
Faculty Mentor's Name: Rajani Muraleedharan
Department: Electrical Enginnering
College: Science, Engineering, & Technology
Supporting Program (e.g., Honors Program, UGRP, etc): UGRP
 
Movement-Mirroring Contactless Robot Assistant
 
Robotic-assisted technology has paved the way for controlling environments remotely with increased precision, efficiency, and safety. For our senior-design project, we have developed a robotic arm prototype capable of mimicking movements of a human arm using a camera and motion tracking algorithm. Robotics provides an opportunity to decrease the human-human interaction necessary to mitigate a viral crisis while also lending a hand to other environmentally sensitive tasks. Using modern three-dimensional cameras and motion tracking software, a robot arm can mimic the movements of a physical human in a remote location making all the aforementioned necessities easily attainable. The designed prototype can be demonstrated at First Robotics Competitions at SVSU to inspire high school students to pursue higher education in engineering. Applications of this technology can also help to advance remote medicine as well as aid in mechanical repairs on spacecrafts.