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July 26, 2017

New facility for SVSU business programs in store, following state budget approval

‌Saginaw Valley State University’s College of Business and Management will soon have a new home for students, faculty, staff and business organizations in the Great Lakes Bay Region and beyond, as SVSU moves forward with plans for a 40,000 square foot building addition.

SVSU’s capital outlay request for $9.8 million in state funding received planning authorization approval in the 2018 fiscal year budget for the State of Michigan signed by Governor Snyder Friday, July 14.

SVSU plans to construct an addition connected to the existing Malcolm Field Theatre for Performing Arts, near Curtiss Hall, where faculty offices for the College of Business of Management are currently located.

The SVSU Foundation has initiated a fundraising campaign, and those efforts will now accelerate. SVSU hopes to generate up to $15 million in private donor support for the project.

“The business world is changing rapidly, and we must change with it,” said Donald Bachand, SVSU president. “We have updated our curriculum; we have added a major in supply chain management and we are starting an online M.B.A. this fall, all to ensure our hard-working students receive the best possible academic preparation. This new facility will allow us to modernize classrooms and learning spaces to match 21st century business realities.

“We would like to thank the many state legislators who supported our proposal, especially State Senator Ken Horn and State Representative Tim Kelly, whose leadership in their respective chambers was greatly appreciated.”

SVSU’s College of Business and Management is accredited by AACSB International, placing SVSU in the top 5 percent of business schools worldwide. Included among the 28 academic programs are specialized opportunities that draw upon the unique business resources of the Great Lakes Bay Region, such as academic minors in entrepreneurship and family business management. SVSU hosts the Dow Entrepreneurship Institute and the Stevens Center for Family Business.

Planned improvements for the new facility include:
•    a Bloomberg Trading Room, that allows students to learn using financial technology
•    an innovation lab, a cross-disciplinary space where students can develop products and market solutions
•    a communications, big data and cloud computer lab to allow for the management of diverse sources of unstructured data and cloud computing
•    a consumer behavior lab and observation room to study what influences consumers’ decisions
•    a focus group lab to allow students to conduct qualitative research

In addition to academic upgrades, the new facility also will feature space for increased collaboration with regional businesses, providing them with access to SVSU faculty and student expertise.

The project still requires construction authorization by the State of Michigan; SVSU hopes to receive that approval later this year with a goal of opening the building during the 2019-20 academic year.

June 20, 2017

SVSU Board approves 2017-18 budget, tuition to increase $474

The Saginaw Valley State University Board of control approved a tuition increase of $474 for in-state students as part of the 2017-18 general fund operating budget adopted during the Board’s regular meeting Monday, June 19.

A Michigan undergraduate student taking 30 credits will pay $9,819 for the upcoming academic year. SVSU students were charged $9,345 during the 2016-17 academic year.

“I was a first-generation college student who worked full-time while going to school, so I understand that any tuition increase can be challenging for students and their families,” said SVSU President Donald Bachand. “At the same time, we have a responsibility to ensure that students receive a high-quality education at the best possible value, and that we continue to invest in their future.

“Our students continue to demonstrate that they can compete with the top students anywhere, as shown through their strong performance in all manner of academic competitions in recent years.”

SVSU will continue to have the lowest tuition among the 15 Michigan public universities for 2017-18, even after the increase of 5.07 percent takes effect.

In other action, the Board:
•    Passed a resolution to congratulate the 2016-2017 SVSU outdoor track and field team, which had both men’s and women’s student-athletes earn All-American honors at the recent NCAA Division II national championships.
•    Passed a resolution to congratulate the 2016-2017 SVSU men’s golf team, which qualified for the NCAA Division II Midwest/Central Super Regional tournament.
•    Passed a resolution to congratulate the 2016-2017 SVSU women’s softball team, which qualified for the NCAA Division II national tournament and advanced to the finals of the Midwest Regional No. 2 tournament.
•    Passed a resolution to approve Board of Fellows emeritus status for the late Vicente Castellanos.
•    Passed a resolution to approve the reappointments of David Dunn, Peter Ewend, Mark Gettel, Tom McIntyre, Michael Rowley and Kenneth Roznowski to the SVSU Board of Fellows, a community advisory board.
•    Passed a resolution to approve the reauthorization of public school academies. SVSU renewed its contract with Charlevoix Montessori Academy for the Arts for three years; Flat River Academy in Greenville and White Pine Academy in Leslie each received two-year renewals.
•    Passed a resolution to approve the confirmation of board members for previously authorized public school academies.
•    Approved revisions to SVSU’s Code of Student Conduct for the 2017-18 academic year.
•    Approved faculty promotions for 30 individuals, effective July 1. Promoted to the rank of professor were: Marty Arford, geography; Lacreta Clark, educational leadership and services; David Cline, teacher education; Adam Coughlin, kinesiology; Mark Giesler, social work; Joe Jaksa, criminal justice; J. Blake Johnson, art; Sara Beth Keough, geography; Art Martin, biology; Tami Sivy, chemistry; Brian Thomas, sociology. Promoted to the rank of professor were: Arundhati Bagchi Misra, mathematical sciences; Jennifer Chaytor, chemistry; Kyle Cissell, chemistry; Denise Dedman, social work; Warren Fincher, sociology; Stacie Krupp, accounting; Kimberly Lacey, English; John Lowry, kinesiology; James McEvoy, biology; Rhett Mohler, geography; Rajani Muraleedharan, electrical and computer engineering; Shiva Nadavulakere, management; Christopher Nakamura, physics; Annamalai Pandian, mechanical engineering; Timothy Rowlands, criminal justice; Rebecca Schlaff, kinesiology; Jason Scott, biology; Kevin Simons, music; Yu Zou, electrical and computer engineering.
•    Passed a resolution to Grant emerita status to Mary Harmon, who retired from SVSU after 25 years on the English faculty.
•    Approved $800,000 in energy conservation projects. SVSU will install LED lights to the interior of a number of campus buildings and will enhanced the chilled water loop that assists with heating and cooling a number of campus buildings. After energy saving rebates are received, the total cost to SVSU will be closer to $400,000.

June 14, 2017

Five SVSU representatives bring their passion to 2017 Miss Michigan competition

The 2017 Miss Michigan Scholarship Pageant in Muskegon will feature a heavy dose of “Red Pride” this week, as five of the 34 contestants hail from Saginaw Valley State University.
 
SVSU students Jaeleen Davis of Bay City and Alana Rae Wilson of Monroe, and recent SVSU alumni Ashli Maser of Au Gres; Mallory Rivard of Bay City; and Kara Terry of Davison will all compete for the crown. Each of them brings passion for their platform – a cause they support – and their university.

Maser’s platform is “S.T.E.M. from Your Roots.” Inspired in part by her own biochemistry studies, she promotes science, technology, engineering and mathematics learning among K-12 students, including visits to classrooms.

“My focus is figuring out how to engage middle school students in STEM through hands-on curriculum,” she said. “What brought me to SVSU was its good science program. To give back by telling other students how much fun STEM can be has been very rewarding. It’s fun to spark their curiosity and hear what they have to say.”

Maser earned second runner-up status in 2016; she and Davis now have advanced to the final weekend for three consecutive years; and Rivard for four years. Wilson competed in Miss Michigan’s final weekend in 2015. Miss Saginaw County was Terry’s first pageant win.

Wilson said her fellow SVSU-affiliated contestants consider each other friends.
 
“Knowing I get to spend a whole week with some of my best friends and get to do what I love at the same time is so exciting for me,” Wilson said. “I am very blessed with all the people I have met and become close with over the years I have been competing.”

Davis has shown a remarkable competitive spirit to remain a contestant. Last July, she suffered a 30-foot fall that fractured several bones and required months of recovery. Her resilience is well established in pageant circles. As a child, Davis was diagnosed with alopecia universalis, a condition that caused her to lose her hair. She has since adopted Wigs 4 Kids as her platform.

“I realized, a hairpiece can fix a child who is aching to feel normal again,” Davis said. “I felt normal — I am normal — because of a hairpiece.”

If Wilson wins this week’s competition, she would be crowned Miss Michigan 30 years after her mother earned the same title. Her mother, Kaye Lani Rae Rafko, also advanced and won the Miss America crown that same year.
 
“That would be very cool, to say the least,” Wilson said about the prospect of winning on the anniversary year of her mother’s victory.
 
“I am here competing for myself — because this is my dream as well — but how exciting would it be to not only become the first mother-daughter Miss Michigan, but then the first mother-daughter Miss America.”
 
The 2017 Miss Michigan Scholarship Pageant contest kicks off with preliminary competition Thursday and Friday, June 15-16. The new Miss Michigan will be crowned during competition that begins at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 17.
 
The Miss Michigan Scholarship Pageant is affiliated with the Miss America Organization, one of the world’s largest providers of scholarships for women. The winner earns a $12,000 scholarship and clinches a spot in the Miss America competition in September. Four runners-up earn $5,000, $4,000, $3,000 and $2,000 scholarships, respectively.
 
To qualify for the Miss Michigan competition, contestants must capture one of 34 pageants in the state. Davis earned Miss Heartland; Maser won Miss Spirit of the State; Rivard earned Miss SouthCentral; Terry won Miss Saginaw County; and Wilson earned Miss Bay County.
 
Davis, a criminal justice and communication major, plans to graduate from SVSU in December 2017.

Maser graduated in May 2016, earning a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry. She plans to attend Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Illinois in the fall.

Rivard graduated from SVSU in May 2017, earning a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and early childhood education. She has been hired full-time as a teacher by Bay City Public Schools.

Terry graduated in May 2017 with a bachelor’s degree in athletic training. She plans to attend graduate school at Auburn University in the fall, studying human nutritional sciences.
 
Wilson, a business management major, expects to graduate in December 2018.

June 6, 2017

Madison Laskowski: Portrait of a 2017 SVSU graduate

From: Auburn

High school: Bay City Western High School

Major: political science

Future: law student, Michigan State University College of Law 

In her circle of friends, Madison Laskowski admits she is the one most likely to trip over her own two feet, but she has proven she knows how to put her best foot forward when it comes to making legal arguments.  

“I’m definitely the goofball of the group,” the Auburn native said, “but I’m ambitious.” 

That ambition drove her to complete her bachelor’s degree in political science at Saginaw Valley State University in May 2017 – in just three yearsThat ambition helped her excel in a crowd of some of the nation’s most talented prospective lawyers. That ambition gained her a full scholarship to the Michigan State University College of Law, where she will begin her studies in the fall, on her way to becoming an attorney.  

Laskowski's entered college with a passion for the law, and the support, encouragement and competitive opportunities she received at SVSU have her well prepared for a successful legal career, said Julie Keilassistant professor of political science and mentor to Laskowski. 

“Madison is a focused, determined young woman who has a clear idea of what she wants to do with her life,” Keil said. 

Laskowski’s circle of friends partly consists of her teammates on SVSU’s undergraduate moot court program, which competes against other institutions in mock courtroom proceedings that draw from constitutional law and Supreme Court cases. Students act as attorneys in teams of two, making arguments to a panel of judges.  

SVSU's program – in six short years – has risen to a top 20 national ranking; more than 350 colleges and universities compete in the American Moot Court AssociationKeil is the founding adviser of SVSU's team and continues to serve in that capacity. 

In November 2016, Laskowski and her teammate — fellow political science major Connor Hughes from Howell — won a regional moot court competition in Chicago.  

The Windy City victory marked the first time an SVSU moot court tandem won an American Moot Court Association regional tournament. They outperformed accomplished programs from institutions such as the University of Chicago, California State University-Long Beach, the College of Wooster, George Washington University, the University of Texas-Dallas, and Loyola University Chicago. 

“It was an amazing moment,” Laskowski said of the point where she learned her team won after one of the five judges broke a split decision. “Things just really clicked and fell into place for us in Chicago.” 

The victory sent her team to the American Moot Court Association’s national competition in Florida in January 2017. 

Keil voiced high praise for Laskowski’s SVSU moot court career. 

“She has been the backbone of the program and one of our most successful students,” Keil said.  

The national tournament performance in Florida capped Laskowski’s 2-year run on the moot court team and launched her toward the next chapter — law school — of a career her family long predicted she would pursue. 

My mom always told me I liked arguing,” Laskowski said. “Sometimes it was over my curfew, or what to pack for lunch. I was a spitfire, and so I figured I could eventually turn that into arguing for the law.” 

During her sophomore year at SVSU, she met KeilLaskowski said her development as a prospective lawyer was a work in progress, but thanks to Keil and the team’s support system, she improved quickly. 

“I had horrible public speaking abilities that first year,” Laskowski said. “It was hard to fully grasp the Constitutional problems we faced, and to be able to articulate that in front of a panel of judges without fumbling over myself.” 

The experience, though, allowed her to better understand her shortcomings and improve upon them by the time she returned to the team for her last year. 

“My second year, I felt like I knew what to do,” she said. “The work ethic was there, the forensics skills were there and things just fell into place.” 

Laskowski served as student president of the moot court program during the year when four SVSU teams — eight dedicated students in total, including Laskowski — qualified for the 2017 nationals. Only two colleges or universities — out of more than 350 nationally — qualified more students to attend the contest. In all, 80 teams with 160 students competed; Laskowski's team placed No. 49 overall. 

“Traveling to the national like that, with some of your best friends, is one of the best experiences I’ve had at SVSU,” she said. 

May 22, 2017

Kevin Finley: Portrait of a 2017 SVSU graduate

From: Flint

High school: Flint Southwestern Academy

Major: Accounting

Future: The Dow Chemical Company, accounting department 

As a future accounting asset to The Dow Chemical Company, Kevin Finley crossed the graduation stage in May 2017 with excitement and a firm sense of purpose after five years at Saginaw Valley State University. The Flint native has replaced childhood scars with an ever-present smile, having learned many valuable lessons inside and outside the classroom.

"In leadership and in life, it's not just about the grades," Finley said.

Finely has the grades – he made the Deans' list all 10 semesters, studying professional accountancy – but it was getting in touch with his values and those of his university, and putting those values into action that taught him as much or more.

"SVSU has taught me that there's more to life than just being smart. Do you care about the community? Are you humble? Do you want to see others around you succeed with you? In life, you can't do anything by yourself and SVSU has that community focus that I really appreciate."

With aspirations to start his own mentorship program one day, Finley started planning out his future while in high school at Flint Southwestern Academy where he took his first accounting class. There, he discovered not only his proficiency in the field, but his love for it as well.

"It just made sense to me," he said.

After discovering this passion, Finley took a tour of SVSU during his senior year of high school. Though he had been considering some other universities at the time, the welcoming campus of SVSU and the friendly people who inhabited it convinced him to enroll.

"I felt like I could really make an impact at SVSU and it was big enough to meet a lot of people but it was small enough to still make an impact," he said.

Finley certainly stood out. As a member of the Roberts Fellowship Program – a student leadership development initiative at SVSU – he built upon his leadership and academic achievement through service projects and study. Finley and nine of his classmates traveled to Asia in May as the culmination of the program.

"One of the goals of the program is to become well-rounded in global citizenship while making us aware of different social issues in different areas of the world," he said.

Recognized by his fellow students, Finley beamed with pride after being elected to Homecoming Court in the fall of 2015.

"It was just an honor to make court – just to have that experience was kind of cool," he said. "I thought, 'Wow. I affected people enough on this campus to even make court.'"

Students knew Finley because he signed up for nearly every high-profile position a student can have. He worked as a resident assistant, a campus tour guide, and an orientation leader, helping new students acclimate to SVSU.

Through his involvement with Delta Sigma Pi, a business fraternity, Finley built his résumé further. He worked his way up, eventually serving as the vice president of finance for a year and a half before serving as the fraternity's president for a year. Finley was awarded the Huron Regional Collegian of the Year in 2016 for Delta Sigma Pi; the award is presented to a member of the fraternity who represents the distinguished values and ideals of the organization through achievement, participation and character.

Finley's drive and determination saw him serve as an accounting tutor in SVSU's tutoring center as well as a research assistant in the Office of Institutional Research. He also worked as an intern with The Dow Chemical Company, where he made connections and secured a full-time job after graduation.

A first-generation college student, Finley remembers a time when the future didn't always look so bright.

"Where I came from, no one really expected me to be a leader," he said. "No one expected me to make Homecoming Court. No one expected me to do all the stuff I'm doing. SVSU allows you to grow your confidence here."

Personal perseverance shaped Finley's confidence.

"I was beaten up really badly in high school," he said. "I was really, really frustrated but then I realized, it's not about who does what to you. It's about your response. I can say, 'I don't want to see that happen to someone else so let me show people that there's more to life than negativity.' I don't want to let stuff like that hinder me. I just want to stay positive."

Finley spreads that positivity through his connections at SVSU, in the community and in his hometown.

"My ultimate goal is to become a CFO – a chief financial officer – of a company, and, although I have a passion for accounting, I also have a passion for mentorship," he said. "Coming from Flint, Michigan, I've always told myself that I wanted to give back by starting a mentorship program or possibly doing a scholarship for people growing up in the Flint area."

Finley learned from multiple mentors to him during his time at SVSU.

"I was really lucky to have great mentors in my life," he said. Among those mentors were Ian Philbrick, a former resident director with SVSU Residential Life.

"He taught me about leadership and he held me accountable. Stuff like that is intangible. You can't put a value on it," Finley said.

Another mentor was Nick Wagner, SVSU's director of institutional research. "He wants to see you succeed. He gives his all to the community and he would always make time for students," Finley said.

Wagner has worked closely with Finley over the course of his time at SVSU and spoke highly of him as both a student and a young professional.

"Kevin has been one of the most unique and profound students I have ever had the chance to interact with at SVSU," Wagner said. "He displays a constant desire to learn and become better all while being selfless and humble. He is a student the university should be extremely proud of and has set the standard for what it means to be a student leader."

With his post-graduation plans locked down, Finley is excited to see where his future will lead. Hard work and dedication certainly play a large role in Finley's story but he also finds motivation in an optimistic attitude and these words of wisdom:

"Be honest with who you are as a student leader," Finley said. "The biggest thing I could recommend to anyone would be to pursue your passion. Even if it takes a little longer, do what makes you happy."

May 16, 2017

Cameron Pratt: Portrait of a 2017 SVSU graduate

From: Howell

High school: Howell High School

Major: Accounting

Future: full-time position in The Dow Chemical Co.’s accounting department 

‌‌Cameron Pratt didn’t need a math equation to discover his professional trajectory. But the math didn’t hurt. 

The Howell native discovered his love for accounting during his sophomore year at Saginaw Valley State University, where he enrolled in an introduction to financial accounting course. He spent much of his remaining time at SVSU capitalizing on opportunities that empowered him to grow and take on new challenges.   

After graduating from the institution in May 2017, Pratt’s dedication and hard work will pay off when he begins a full-time job working in the accounting department at The Dow Chemical Company in June. 

“I found a purpose in the numbers of accounting that I couldn’t find in any other academic program,”

 he said. “I fell in love with the business.” 

Pratt accepted the job offer 10 months earlier, contingent on his graduation. The combination of factors leading to that opportunity included classroom studies, outside-of-classroom university organizations and a Dow internship Pratt discovered through SVSU’s Career Services. 

Hired as an intern with Dow’s accounting department in the summer of 2016, Pratt spent much of his 3-month stint on a single project that involved collecting and analyzing data relating to a pricing policy that affected the company globally.  

“I was using a (computer) system that only 11 people in the world knew how to use,” Pratt said. “It was a great opportunity.” 

His complex analytics and thoughtful conclusions caught the attention of his employers.  

“The rest is history,” said Pratt, who shortly thereafter was offered a full-time position that will begin June 12. 

Pratt’s path to Dow started at SVSU with that introductory accounting class, and included one of the university’s competitive programs for business students: The Vitito Global Leadership Institute. The initiative develops leadership abilities for students enrolled in SVSU’s College of Business & Management, while exposing them to international business environments.  

Kaustav Misra, an associate professor of economics and chair of the Vitito program, described Pratt as “dedicate, passionate and hard working.” 

“He is definitely one of our best students in the college,” Misra said. “He is modest, respectful and has a very high level of people skills, which will definitely help him in the long run to grow as a leader. His sincerity, work ethic and team spirit are really commendable.”  

Pratt was selected as one of 12 Vitito Fellows in the winter of 2016. The program heightened his understanding of international commerce while also providing him with a new network of friends. 

“The Vitito Fellowship connected me with 11 amazing individuals who I still keep in close contact with,” he said. Recently, when a family member of a Vitito Fellow died, Pratt and others with the group attended the funeral and offered support. 

“The camaraderie involved in that program is one of the big things I will remember fondly when I think of my experience at SVSU,” he said. 

Pratt also spent time as a student tutor for accounting.  

“When you work with students on that level, it helps you better understand the subject you’re teaching,” he said. “It instills confidence. It’s really fulfilling to work with people and help them in that way.” 

Pratt said the experience as a mentor also exposed him to another role he one day could pursue: an accounting professorship. 

“Something like that could be way down the road, but I feel like working as a tutor showed me that I could enjoy teaching the subject,” he said. 

Pratt also served as president of the SVSU College of Business & Management’s Dean’s Student Advisory Council, exposing him to more opportunities to sharpen his leadership skills.  

“It gave me confidence in myself that I could be a leader,” he said. “I had to be accountable for my actions and push people to reach their potentials. You’re never truly done learning how to lead, but that was a good start for me.” 

Pratt defies the stereotype that accountants have no sense of humor. His varied interests led him to pursue another of SVSU's multifaceted opportunities. During his junior year, Pratt was a writer for an on-campus sketch comedy troupe called Cardinal Night Live, based in part on NBC’s Saturday Night Live program. 

“That was a unique departure from my normal activities,” he said. “That really helped me broaden my horizons. It was a great experience.” 

“A great experience” ithe same phrase Pratt used when recalling — and running the numbers — on his years as an SVSU undergraduate.  

May 11, 2017

Sloan Klaski: Portrait of a 2017 SVSU graduate

From: Harbor Beach

High school: Harbor Beach High School

Major: Criminal Justice & Marketing double major

Future: graduate school, SVSU's Masters in Business Administration

Sloan Klaski looks to the future with excitement and a smile on his face as he describes his goals in the years to come. Many Saginaw Valley State University graduates share his positive outlook; few have faced as many obstacles.

A standout football player at small Harbor Beach High School in Michigan's Thumb, Klaski was featured on the front page of The Detroit Free Press sports section in November 2012, but not for making plays on the gridiron. "Klaski leads from the sidelines," the headline read, a reference to how he supported his teammates through an injury that denied him nearly all of his senior season.

Klaski came to SVSU to play linebacker while majoring in both criminal justice and marketing. He recorded 47 tackles in each of his first two seasons before injury struck again, forcing him to miss the 2016 season.

Life has taught Klaski a lesson or two about determination, so while he graduated in May, he is not finished in the classroom or on the football field. Due to his injury, he has two seasons of college eligibility remaining and a graduate degree in his sights.

When Klaski completes his football career, he plans to serve his country.

"I'll be getting my M.B.A. through SVSU," he said. "My goal is to end up getting into a federal law enforcement agency, whether that's the FBI or DEA, something like that."

For his senior seminar, Klaski took a class with Joseph Jaksa, SVSU associate professor of criminal justice. Having worked closely with Klaski, Jaksa has confidence that he is moving forward with a good head on his shoulders and a highly desirable skill-set.

"There are a lot of students in the United States who have good grades in the criminal justice program," Jaksa said. "Sloan has the benefit of outstanding grades in criminal justice plus the successful rigors of a student-athlete. That's going to show any federal law enforcement agency that this young man is going to be capable of taking on the stresses and rigors of their agency."

Though many students struggle to identify their field of study within their first few years of college, Klaski wasn't one of them. He described the desire to go into the field of criminal justice as a family business.

"Multiple members of my family were in the military including my dad, grandpa, two cousins and an uncle. That's part of the reason why the job I wanted to pursue was a service-related job."

The connection didn't stop there. Klaski explained that he also has a cousin who went the route of law enforcement, working as a police officer, as well as a close friend who works as a border patrol agent.

"All of these people have helped influence my journey and helped to steer me in the direction I'm headed," he said. "Ultimately, I would like to join the FBI and eventually become part of their special forces on the hostage rescue team."

Klaski has refused to let injuries stand in the way of helping others. While sidelined, he actively worked with young people through SVSU's Community Youth Days and Special Olympics.

"Sloan is one of those rare exceptions where he does everything 110 percent," Jaksa said. "A lot of people say they do it but Sloan really does. Between his grade point and knowing the amount of work he has to put into his classes to get that and being a football player: That's not an easy thing to do. There's no doubt in my mind that anything Sloan decides to do, he's going to be outstanding at it because of his mindset."

SVSU offered Klaski the chance to not only pursue his career goals and follow in the footsteps of so many of his family members before him, but it also gave him the opportunity to step out onto the field in a Cardinals uniform and play the game he loves every fall.

For this and so many other reasons, Klaski is grateful to SVSU.

"It just felt like the right place for me," he said.

Four years after arriving -- with degree in hand -- it will remain his place for a little while longer.

 

 

May 1, 2017

SVSU honors students deliver thesis presentations

Fifteen students from Saginaw Valley State University’s Honors Program delivered their thesis presentations Friday, April 7, inside Gilbertson Hall on SVSU’s campus.
 
The topics during the honors symposium ranged from disabled characters in Victorian fairy tales to veterinarian practices in the United States and France to the culture of fraud in the United States.
 
The SVSU Honors Program is a competitive program that selects 80 incoming freshmen students per year. It allows students to pursue their major and minor degree work while providing enriched academic experiences in honors courses, seminars, research projects and social activities.
 
The thesis presentation, during which students discuss and defend their findings to an audience of peers and university faculty and staff, is the culmination of their time in the program. The following students presented:
 
Katie L. Gall, an English major from Hemlock, whose presentation was titled “Is black so base a hue? A character analysis of Aaron in Shakespeare’s “Titus Andronicus.” Her faculty advisor was Daniel Gates, an associate professor of English.
 
Stephen J. Holihan, a biology major from Saginaw, whose presentation was titled “Developmental aromatase inhibition through endocrine disruption and the effects of sexually dimorphic morphology and brain organization in the Norway rat.” His faculty advisor was Gary Lange, a professor of biology.
 
Michaela M. Hoogerhyde, a marketing major from Mancelona, whose presentation was titled “Mood and luxury perception: A tale of two genders.” Her faculty advisor was Mazen Jaber, an associate professor of marketing.
 
Graceson C. Kerr, an exercise science major from Grand Blanc, whose presentation was titled “Primary care students’ perceptions of using physical activity counseling as a medical intervention.” Her faculty advisor was John Lowry, an assistant professor of kinesiology.
 
Jessie R. Klisz, an accounting major from Beverly Hills, whose presentation was titled “Fraud in the United States and the culture that cultivates it.” Her faculty advisor was Besty Pierce, an assistant professor of accounting.
 
Tyler J. Lefevre, a biochemistry major from Bay City, whose presentation was titled “Validation of qPCR rapid bacterial quantification through viable E. Coli cell count in the Saginaw Bay Watershed.” His faculty advisor was Tami Sivy, an associate professor of chemistry.
 
Haley E. Livingston, a biology major from Holt, whose presentation was titled “A comparative examination of veterinary practice and opinion between the United States and France.” Her faculty advisor was Lange.
 
Bethany C. McCarry, a physics major from Auburn, whose presentation was titled “Frequency and temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility.” Her faculty advisor was Matthew Vannette, an associate professor of physics.
 
Victoria R. Phelps, an English major from Rochester Hills, whose presentation was titled “Depictions of disabilities once upon a time: Analyzing disabled characters in the context of Victorian fairy tales.” Her faculty advisor was Daniel Cook, an associate professor of English.
 
Emily K. Phillips, a graphic design major from Carleton, whose presentation was titled “Creating quality design for the restaurant industry: The rebranding of the White Horse Inn.” Her faculty advisor was Thomas Canale, a professor of art.
 
Cameron L. Pratt, an accounting major from Bay City, whose presentation was titled “The equilibrium point hypothesis: An analysis of firm performance and renewable energy development in publicly held U.S. electrical utility companies. His faculty advisor was Mark McCartney, a professor of accounting.
 
Madison J. Rase, a chemistry major from Pinconning, whose presentation was titled “Anaerobic digestion of phragmites.” Her faculty advisor was David Karpovich, the Herbert H. Dow Endowed Professor of Chemistry.
 
Nicholas P. Toupin, a biochemistry major from Dearborn, whose presentation was titled “Effects of alkyl chain length on gel-forming carbohydrates.” His faculty advisor was Jennifer Chaytor, an assistant professor of chemistry.
 
Rachel J. Weller, an accounting major from Fenton, whose presentation was titled “Measuring up: An analysis of state CPA requirements and pass rates.” Her faculty advisor was McCartney.
 
Kylie M. Wojciechowski, an undecided major from Bay City, whose presentation was titled “Advocating for student-users: Results and recommendations of a usability study of the WCONLINE platform.” Her faculty advisor was William Williamson, a professor of rhetoric and professional writing.

May 1, 2017

SVSU inducts 14 students to business honor society

The College of Business and Management at Saginaw Valley State University honored and inducted 14 students to Beta Gamma Sigma, the honor society serving business programs accredited by AACSB International.

Membership in Beta Gamma Sigma is the highest recognition a business student anywhere in the world can receive in a business program accredited by AACSB International. Less than 5 percent of the 13,000 collegiate business programs worldwide are so accredited.

The SVSU students inducted are:
•    Alyssa Ableiding, an accounting major from Hillman;
•    Shafayatul Alam, a management major from Bangladesh;
•    Ray Altoft, an accounting major from Lake Odessa;
•    Mikayla Ballor, a management major from Freeland;
•    Jenna Brown, a management major from Saginaw;
•    Sara Cramer, an accounting major from Munger;
•    Ingrid Hannevig, an international business major from Norway;
•    Spencer Leach, a finance major from Bay City;
•    Megan McGarry, an accounting major from Eaton Rapids;
•    Michael Miller, an accounting major from Dewitt;
•    Yiliang Quian, a master of business administration student from China;
•    Trevor Thomson, a finance major from Essexville;
•    Gan Xie, a master of business administration student from China;
•    Xuefei Xu, a master of business administration student from China.


The top 10 percent of junior and senior students as well as the top 20 percent of master's students are eligible for membership to the organization. Since 2003, 238 SVSU students and 23 SVSU faculty and staff have been inducted. This year’s ceremony was held Friday, April 7.

For a list of students inducted in 2016 and in previous years visit: http://www.svsu.edu/collegeofbusinessmanagement/studentopportunities/betagammasigma/.

April 24, 2017

Consumers Energy deputy general counsel, SVSU alum, to address SVSU May graduates

The vice president of a Michigan energy company will deliver the keynote address to graduates during Commencement exercises next month at Saginaw Valley State University.

Shaun M. Johnson, an SVSU alumnus who is the deputy general counsel for CMS Energy and its principal subsidiary Consumers Energy, will speak at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 5, and again at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 6, in O’Neill Arena.

Commencement exercises for graduates in the colleges of Business & Management and Health & Human Services will be held Friday evening. Students completing degrees in the colleges of Arts & Behavioral Sciences; Education; and Science, Engineering & Technology will take part in the ceremony scheduled for Saturday morning.

The graduating class consists of 1,146 students who are expected to complete degrees, including 1,022 individuals who have indicated they intend to don regalia and march in the ceremonies. The class includes 987 who will receive bachelor’s degrees and 159 who will receive master’s or education specialist degrees.

As is tradition, SVSU President Don Bachand will congratulate each graduate as he or she crosses the stage.

Johnson’s path to his position with CMS Energy began at SVSU, where he served as president of SVSU’s student government and was a member of Sigma Pi fraternity. Representing and advocating for his fellow students was an interest of Johnson’s since his teenage years, when he was the president of the student government at Sanford-Meridian High School for three years. With a goal of getting students more involved on SVSU’s campus, Johnson was the Campus Events chair for Student Association, the student government, before ascending to president.

An Edenville native, Johnson graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from SVSU in 2002 and then completed a law degree at Michigan State University, graduating with Summa Cum Laude honors. Johnson served on the SVSU Alumni Association Board of Directors from 2005 to 2008.

Johnson formerly was a partner for the law firm Dykema Gossett PLLC, serving as the director of the firm’s energy industry group and specializing in public utilities, energy, and taxation. In his director position, he served as an attorney and lobbyist for several public utility and energy clients throughout the United States, helping develop cost-effective business strategies and goals. Johnson also represented elected public officials, political action committees, and constitutional ballot question committees.

In his position with CMS Energy, Johnson oversees all litigation, general practice, and federal energy regulatory issues. He also provides legal oversight for business development activities, including mergers and acquisitions. A Dewitt resident, Johnson also serves as the chair of the Michigan Bar Association’s Administrative Law Section.

For information about Commencement exercises at SVSU, visit www.svsu.edu/commencement/.

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