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February 28, 2020

SVSU students set to help communities across the U.S. during spring break

Sixty Saginaw Valley State University students will continue their predecessors’ tradition of spending spring break week providing support and good will to in-need communities across the nation.
 
SVSU’s Alternative Breaks program organized six groups — with 10 students participating in each — set to begin traveling when spring break week begins Saturday, Feb. 29.
 
When they arrive at their destinations, each team will spend the week supporting agencies and nonprofits engaging a variety of issues including providing shelter for those in need, empowering communities to overcome racism, and educating children about HIV and AIDS.
 
The following is a list of the planned Alternative Breaks trips and objectives:
  • At the Capital Area Therapeutic Riding Association in Grantville, Pennsylvania, SVSU students will support individuals with special needs and disabilities by exploring non-traditional therapies that could benefit them. At the nonprofit, that “non-traditional therapy” often involves connecting visitors with animals such as horses, goats and cats.
  • In Memphis, SVSU volunteers will provide education about HIV and AIDS to children at Hope House Memphis, a nonprofit that works with families affected by HIV and poverty.
  • Students will join the effort to eliminate substandard housing and provide shelter for the homeless with the nonprofit known as Sussex County Habitat for Humanity in Georgetown, Delaware.
  • With the help of Sisu Integrated Early Learning — a nonprofit in Gainesville, Georgia — students will advocate for education and literacy to the region’s youth.
  • SVSU volunteers will support women both recovering from drug addiction and suffering from mental health disorders at the Nashville organization known as Mending Hearts Inc.
  • In St. Louis, students will assist LifeWise STL, a nonprofit that helps in-need individuals and families prosper financially by addressing systemic barriers in society such as racism.
Alternative Breaks is a student-run organization that has organized volunteer efforts during breaks in SVSU’s school scheduling — including the winter break — since 2004.
 
Social media users can follow the SVSU Alternative Breaks group updates via Facebook at www.facebook.com/svsuAlternativeBreaks and Twitter at www.twitter.com/ab_svsu.
 

February 28, 2020

Hometown Hollywood star Brian d'Arcy James to perform with students at SVSU event

Saginaw-born Broadway and Hollywood actor Brian d’Arcy James will grace the stage alongside Saginaw Valley State University student performers as part of a one-night-only song-and-dance extravaganza at the campus next month.

The curtains open for “An Actors Showcase” Monday, March 30, at 7:30 p.m. in SVSU’s Malcolm Field Theatre for Performing Arts.

Joining James that evening will be some of the university’s top theatre students as well as award-winning Gershwin pianist Kevin Cole. James plans to meet, mentor and rehearse with the students in advance of the event, when they will perform a series of songs and monologues on stage.

The event is free, but due to anticipated high demand, attendees must reserve tickets. They are available online by clicking here. Once the theatre reaches capacity, SVSU will offer ticket reservations to a simulcast in the adjoining campus venue, the Rhea Miller Recital Hall.

James' introduction to much of the performing arts world began on Broadway. Perhaps most famously there, he donned green makeup as the titular character in “Shrek the Musical” from 2008-09, earning a Tony Award nomination for Best Leading Actor in a Musical along the way. The performance later was captured for a feature-length film available now on Netflix.

Playing Shrek earned him the second of three Tony Award nominations for leading actor in a musical. The first was for “Sweet Smell of Success” in 2002. Most recently, he received a nomination for “Something Rotten!” in 2015.

His on-stage résumé also includes serving as an original cast member of “Hamilton,” playing King George III.

James’ star continued to brighten when he transitioned to the big screen. Perhaps his most notable movie role to date was in “Spotlight,” which won Best Picture at the Academy Awards after its release in 2015. He portrayed real-life Boston Globe reporter Matt Carroll in the drama about a team of newspaper journalists uncovering a community scandal.

He became even more of a household name when he appeared in the popular Netflix series, “13 Reasons Why,” now entering its fourth and final season. He plays Andrew Baker, the father of the character whose suicide sets the series’ plot in motion.

Later this year, the 51-year-old is scheduled to appear in the Steven Spielberg-directed remake of “West Side Story.”

James graduated from Nouvel Catholic Central High School of Saginaw Township in 1986.

February 27, 2020

SVSU introducing eSports program as club sport for fall 2020

Inspired by passionate players and fans in a rapidly-growing field of competition, Saginaw Valley State University will hit the “start” button on its own club sports team in fall 2020 for competitive video game players.

Competitive video game leagues – commonly known as "eSports" – are quickly gaining popularity. The largest league governing college competition grew from seven to 170 teams between 2016 and 2019.

“The level of student interest in eSports is extremely high and we look forward to providing this new opportunity for student engagement,” said Brian Thomas, SVSU's associate vice president for Academic Affairs.

eSports are played with individual competitors or teams of up to eight people. Competitions can be played with teams in a central location or via online-based tournaments. Those competitions feature players battling for top scores in popular games such as "Fortnite," "Overwatch," "League of Legends," "Super Smash Bros." and "Hearthstone" on consoles such as Nintendo Switch, Playstation 4 and XBox One. Worldwide market revenue from eSports competition surpassed $1 billion last year, compared to $130 million in 2012.

SVSU's campus is ripe territory for such a competition and its students are hungry to participate, Thomas said. The opportunity will offer more than simply a fun outlet for fans of video games.

“By creating a dedicated space with high-end gaming computers, students will be able to practice and compete while at the same time socializing around a sport that they love,” Thomas said. “With the rapid growth of eSports as an industry, this will create new opportunities for academic collaborations ranging from computer science and electrical engineering to business and graphic design.”

SVSU's eSports club will launch with a dedicated space on campus – at a location still yet to be determined – likely featuring 13 gaming computers along with video streaming and monitoring equipment, Thomas said.

At the same time, eSports will be organized competitively as a club sport. The gaming space will be available to members of the club team and other SVSU students as well.

James Stahl, an SVSU criminal justice major, said he expects an eSports club will be a smash hit with his peers. He would know. As a leader of an SVSU student organization that has hosted video game tournaments, Stahl has witnessed a growing appetite for a club sport dedicated to gaming on campus.

“It's going to be big,” Stahl said, predicting the response of students to an eSports club. “Depending on how it's handled, it could be really big.”

Stahl served three years as president of Press Start, the SVSU student organization that hosts a variety of video game-centric events across campus. He said a tournament hosted recently by the group attracted more than 100 gamers from across the state to SVSU.

“To see more than 100 people in a bracket tournament, playing 'Super Smash Bros.' is chaos but so fun,” said Stahl, who remains a member of Press Start this year.

Stahl has attended gaming tournaments outside of SVSU, including a Detroit-based competition known as The Big House 8 that featured more than 1,000 players during an October 2019 event.

“Unless you've been to a gaming competition, it's hard to describe the excitement in the room,” he said. “It's a spectator sport, so it's a lot like a crowd watching football.”

Before the eSports club is launched in the fall, SVSU plans to host video game tournaments on Saturday, May 2, Thomas said.

The main event will involve a tournament playing "Overwatch," a popular first-person shooter available on all major gaming consoles. That particular game will be limited to high school students while others will invite all members of the public. "Overwatch" participants will compete for $1,000 scholarships on the stage of the Rhea Miller Recital Hall. Tournaments for "Fortnite," "League of Legends," and "Super Smash Bros. Ultimate" will take place at the same time. All tournaments will be free of charge and include prizes. 

Those interested in participating in the May 2 tournament can contact Thomas at bjthoma1@svsu.edu.

SVSU currently offers 20 club sports, ranging from ice hockey and volleyball to cricket and equestrian.

February 27, 2020

Update on SVSU measures regarding coronavirus

Members of the campus community:

We care about your well-being and we want to update you regarding the measures SVSU is taking regarding the 2019 Novel Coronavirus.

As of this writing (Feb. 27), there are no confirmed cases in Michigan. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control states that “for the general American public, who are unlikely to be exposed to the virus at this time, the immediate health risk from COVID-19 is considered low.”

However, this is a developing public health emergency that is spreading in other parts of the world, and we want to inform you about the steps we are taking as a university and steps you can take as individuals. We want you to be educated and to stay healthy.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that can cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory-tract illnesses, similar to the common cold. Symptoms may include runny nose, headache, cough, sore throat, fever, and a general feeling of being unwell.

The viruses also can sometimes cause lower-respiratory-tract illnesses, such as pneumonia or bronchitis. These appear more commonly in people with cardiopulmonary disease or a weakened immune system, and in older adults and infants. Symptoms can appear two to 14 days after exposure to the virus.

Currently, there is no vaccine to prevent the COVID-19 virus. The best way to prevent infection is to take simple precautions such as: 

  • Wash your hands frequently for at least 20 seconds 

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands 

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick 

  • Stay home when you are sick 

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces

Travel Restrictions

The U.S. Department of State upgraded its warning against travel to China to the highest level, advising Americans not to travel there due to the coronavirus outbreak.

As a result, SVSU has cancelled all planned trips to China for the remainder of the academic year, and we have temporary restrictions for all university-sponsored travel to China. These restrictions will remain in place as long as circumstances warrant, and we will continue to monitor federal guidance regarding travel to other countries.

In addition, we have consulted with our sister institutions in China and have canceled inbound trips from students and faculty who had been planning to visit SVSU later this year. 

For personal travel, we strongly advise all students, faculty and staff to follow travel alerts from the Centers for Disease Control and U.S. State Department.

As always, the health and safety of all members of our campus community is our top priority. Ou r Office of International Programs has been offering support services to students who have family or loved ones affected or otherwise have concerns related to this virus outbreak. International Programs also is available to assist students with issues related to international travel, immigration matters. etc. The Student Counseling Center is a resource for students who desire to speak with a trained professional in a confidential setting. We ask everyone to please be mindful of the stresses our community members may be feeling and be sensitive to them and their needs.

Thank you for taking the time to be and stay informed, and for taking precautions to protect yourself and others. We will continue to monitor updates from local, state and federal officials and communicate with you as developments dictate. 

This statement was updated on Thursday, Feb. 27.

February 25, 2020

SVSU-sponsored poetry contest salutes Saginaw

A community-minded poetry contest celebrating the history and culture of Saginaw County is underway, sponsored by the Saginaw Valley State University-operated Saginaw Community Writing Center.
 
The objective of the contest: pen a poem inspired by Saginaw’s people, places or past. Up to three winners will earn a $100 cash prize.
 
Participants must write the poem on postcards supplied for free by the Saginaw Community Writing Center at three Saginaw County locations. Each poem must include the words “Saginaw, I believe.”
 
The contest is open to individuals who live, work or study in Saginaw County.
 
Individuals can pick up the free postcards at the Butman-Fish Branch Library, 1716 Hancock in Saginaw; the Little Free Library book-sharing box located at SVRC Marketplace, 203 S. Washington in downtown Saginaw; or the Diane Boehm Writing Center, located on the second floor of SVSU’s Zahnow Library at the Kochville Township campus.
 
The postcards, designed by Sally Giroux's middle school art students from Saginaw Arts and Sciences Academy (SASA), feature scenery and imagery from across the community.
 
"We are pleased to have the opportunity to collaborate with SASA students to create these postcards that celebrate the city of Saginaw,” said Helen Raica-Klotz, co-director of the Saginaw Community Writing Center. "We are hopeful that their artwork will inspire our area writers to create work that showcases our city and celebrates its vibrant community."
 
Participants must mail the postcards by Sunday, March 15 to the Diane Boehm Writing Center, SVSU, 7400 Bay Road, University Center, MI 48710.
 
Contest guidelines are as follows:
  • Each participant may submit a maximum of three poems
  • All poems must not exceed 20 lines, and need to fit on the back of the postcard
  • Handwriting must be legible
Questions can be directed via email to the Saginaw Community Writing Center at scwc@svsu.edu.
 
After the contest is completed, Saginaw Community Writing Center representatives will work with members of The Ezekiel Project, a Saginaw nonprofit, to create a display of the poems and postcards at a location in downtown Saginaw.

February 21, 2020

Thursday presentations to showcase SVSU's $25.4M business college expansion, faculty; magazine editor, business leaders among presenters

Representatives of Saginaw Valley State University’s Carmona College of Business will showcase their expertise and present their new $25.4 million facility during a day-long event Thursday, Feb. 27. Then, in the evening, the editor of a popular magazine exploring economics will cap off the series of presentations aimed in part at introducing the public to the 38,500-square-foot addition to the campus.
 
All sessions are free and open to the public. Guests also are encouraged to explore the building expansion’s laboratories, classrooms and cutting-edge meeting spaces.
 
The sessions — largely hosted in the new facility from 9:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. — will focus on business industry trends while also examining the impact of SVSU programs based in its business college building.
 
The added facility will house classrooms, faculty offices and business programs. The new space also includes analytics labs and a Bloomberg Trading Room, which tracks stock data in real time. Upgrades will provide hands-on learning opportunities for students while also encouraging members of the business community to visit campus and engage with students.
 
SVSU faculty members soon will be leading classrooms and programs within the building expansion. First, though, many members of that same faculty — as well as program directors at the university as well as representatives from the regional business community — will provide presentations during the Feb. 27 showcase.
 
From 9:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m., more than 20 45-minute-long presentations will explore business-related topics including entrepreneurship strategies, social media-based marketing, and a review of analytics systems used in business industries. Other sessions will feature alumni sharing their success stories. Faculty members and business leaders will introduce SVSU business college-based resources and explore how those tools will benefit the region. Members of SVSU’s moot court team — ranked No. 17 in the nation — will discuss the program’s success and other pre-law school initiatives at SVSU. The showcase also will feature presentations about student-assisted research pursued by faculty members.
 
The lone showcase event hosted in the evening and in a venue located elsewhere on campus will be the keynote presentation from Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of Wired magazine. His appearance is scheduled at 7 p.m. in SVSU’s Malcolm Field Theatre for Performing Arts, located in the Groening Commons complex that adjoins the business college expansion.
 
A monthly magazine with an online presence, Wired since 1993 has provided award-winning content on topics including economics, technology, politics and culture. In his presentation, Thompson plans to talk about how technology’s ever-evolving landscape will shape culture as well as economics for the future.
 
The Thursday event follows a dedication ceremony for the business college expansion planned Monday, Feb. 24, at 1 p.m. in the Malcolm Field Theatre for Performing Arts.
 
SVSU Foundation earlier this week announced the completion of a $15.6 million fundraising campaign for the expansion. The building addition also was supported by $9.8 million in funding from the State of Michigan.
 
Below is a schedule of the Carmona College of Business showcase sessions open to the public from 9:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. All sessions are hosted inside the Carmona College of Business expansion:
 
Sessions from 9:30 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.
 
“Using Your Strengths”
Room CCB 201
Betsy Pierce, associate professor of accounting
Pierce will share how individuals can focus on their unique strengths to work more successfully individually and within groups. Pierce is certified as a coach in the CliftonStrengths program, an initiative that assesses the strengths and talents of individuals and how those traits can best be utilized in group settings.
 
"Living the Entrepreneurship Dream"
Room CCB 214
David Bell, associate director of Entrepreneurship Experiential Learning and Continuing Education
SVSU student and alumni entrepreneurs will share their experiences about developing their own businesses from idea to startup. They will touch on the rewarding aspects of transforming business ideas into business plans, and how they have overcome challenges along the way.
 
"Game Theory in Action: The Prisoner's Dilemma"
Room CCB 216
Kellie Konsor, assistant professor of economics
Konsor will be discussing strategic decision-making theories and they relate to economics.
 
"Family Business Sustaining for Generations"
Room CCB 217
Martha Zehnder Kaczynski, vice president of sales for Frankenmuth Bavarian Inn Lodge; Jordan Thieme, director of operations at Amigo Mobility International; and SVSU student presenters
The session will feature family business leaders discussing the unique rewards and challenges of owning and operating a family business. It will also include discussion with students who have participated in the annual global Family Enterprise Case Competition, where students across the world work to solve complex family business cases.
 
Sessions from 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.
 
"Building Entrepreneurial Skills"
Room CCB 113
David Bell, associate director of Entrepreneurship Experiential Learning and Continuing Education
Bell will guide the audience through a discussion on the steps taken to achieve a successful business startup, as well as an experiential exercise that focuses on developing various entrepreneurial skills.
 
"Designing Your Life"
Room CCB 201
Amy Hendrickson, associate professor of law
Following an approach pioneered at Stanford University, Hendrickson will discuss strategies aimed at improving skills related to leadership, innovation and creativity; and how to apply those principles to everyday life.
 
"Social Media Marketing: Collaborative Learning with Great Lakes Bay Businesses"
Room CCB 216
Chatdanai Pongpatipat, assistant professor of marketing
Pongpatipat will demonstrate social media-based collaborative work between SVSU students and regional business partners.
 
"Resources to Support Economic Growth with Regional Manufacturers"
Room CCB 217
Jeremy Bockelman, director of Michigan Manufacturing Technology Center; and Matthew Shoffner, assistant director of Michigan Manufacturing Technology Center
Bockelman and Shoffner will lead an interactive simulation of a "5S Lean Manufacturing Tool."
 
Sessions from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
 
"Living the Entrepreneurship Dream"
Room CCB 113
David Bell, associate director of Entrepreneurship Experiential Learning and Continuing Education
SVSU student and alumni entrepreneurs will share their experiences about developing their own businesses from idea to startup. They will touch on the rewarding aspects of transforming business ideas into business plans, and how they have overcome challenges along the way.
 
"Virtual Reality in Surveys and Research"
Room CCB 216
Kevin Meyer, assistant professor of economics
Meyer will describe and demonstrate his recent research in environmental economics that involved two SVSU students conducting a survey on lake pollution using virtual reality.
 
"Family Business Sustaining for Generations"
Room CCB 217
Amy Zehnder Grossi, general manager of Frankenmuth Bavarian Inn Lodge; Jordan Thieme, director of operations at Amigo Mobility International; Jennifer Thieme Kehres, director of business development at Amigo Mobility International; and SVSU student presenters
The session will feature family business leaders discussing the unique rewards and challenges of owning and operating a family business. It will also include discussion with students who have participated in the annual global Family Enterprise Case Competition, where students across the world work to solve complex family business cases.
 
Sessions from 1:30 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
 
"Building Entrepreneurial Skills"
Room CCB 114
David Bell, associate director of Entrepreneurship Experiential Learning and Continuing Education
Bell will guide the audience through a discussion on the steps taken to achieve a successful business startup, as well as an experiential exercise that focuses on developing various entrepreneurial skills.
 
"Designing Your Life"
Room CCB 201
Amy Hendrickson, associate professor of law
Following an approach pioneered at Stanford, Hendrickson will discuss how to use design thinking to start working as a better leader, innovator and creator, and how to apply these principles to everyday life.
 
"The Power of SAP, ERP and Analytics"
Room CCB 214
Prashanth Anekal, associate professor of management
Anekal will lead an interactive session in which the audience will be introduced to analytics systems.
 
"Reimagining the Carmona College of Business: Positive Benefits for Students and the Great Lakes Bay Region"
Room CCB 216
Joseph Ofori-Dankwa, SVSU’s Harvey Randall Wickes Endowed Professor
Ofori-Dankwa will lead a team of SVSU students enrolled in the Vitito Fellowship Program to facilitate an interactive session that re-imagines different roles and benefits for students, faculty, staff and community partners as a result of the impact of the Scott L. Carmona College of Business expansion. The Vitito Fellowship Program is an initiative that provides leadership development for SVSU students studying in the business college.
 
"Resources to Support Economic Growth with Regional Manufacturers"
Room CCB 217
Jeremy Bockelman, director of Michigan Manufacturing Technology Center; and Matthew Shoffner, assistant director of Michigan Manufacturing Technology Center
Bockelman and Shoffner will lead an interactive simulation of a "5S Lean Manufacturing Tool."
 
Sessions from 2:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.
 
"Living the Entrepreneurship Dream"
Room CCB 113
David Bell, associate director of Entrepreneurship Experiential Learning and Continuing Education
SVSU student and alumni entrepreneurs will share their experiences about developing their own businesses from idea to startup. They will touch on the rewarding aspects of transforming business ideas into business plans, and how they have overcome challenges along the way.
 
"Using Your Strengths"
Room CCB 201
Betsy Pierce, associate professor of accounting
Pierce will share how individuals can focus on their unique strengths to work more successfully individually and with groups. Pierce is certified as a coach in the CliftonStrengths program, an initiative that assesses the strengths and talents of individuals and how those traits can best be utilized in group settings.
 
"Carmona College of Business Young Alumni Board"
Room CCB 216
Lauren Miller, 2018 SVSU alumna; and Connor Doyle, 2019 SVSU alumnus
Recent SVSU graduates Miller and Doyle will talk about their experiences as students as well as members of the Young Alumni Organization. Representatives from Career Services and Alumni Relations will also be in attendance to talk about the resources available to SVSU alumni.
 
"SVSU Moot Court Demonstration"
Room CCB 217
Amy Hendrickson, associate professor of law, and members of the SVSU moot court team
Hendrickson will facilitate a mini-moot court demonstration featuring Justin Weller and Justine Brabaw, members of the nationally ranked SVSU moot court team. This session will also include information about the Law Club and Pre-Law program.

February 20, 2020

Campus, community to celebrate SVSU’s $25.4M business college expansion opening

“A game changer” expected to boost the region’s business community for generations will be celebrated Monday, Feb. 24, by leaders from across the state during a dedication ceremony for Saginaw Valley State University’s soon-to-open $25.4 million business school expansion.
 
The ceremony will be hosted at 1 p.m. in SVSU’s Malcolm Field Theatre for Performing Arts, which adjoins the 38,500-square-foot addition that will house the Scott L. Carmona College of Business. A public open house inside the building addition will follow the event.
 
Deborah Huntley, SVSU provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, called the building addition “a physical manifestation of our purpose and our vision to be renowned for innovative teaching, experiential learning and state-of-the art facilities.”
 
The new space includes data analytics labs and Bloomberg Trading terminals, which track stock data in real time. Upgrades include cutting-edge equipment used by Fortune 500 companies, providing students with hands-on experience utilizing resources adapted to match global business trends. Access to tools and tech fine-tuned for the next generation strengthen an academic college already honored with an AACSB-International accreditation, a gold standard distinction earned by fewer than 5 percent of the world’s business colleges.
 
“We believe that, in this facility, prospective students, prospective faculty and business leaders will recognize our commitment to innovation and excellence, and make SVSU the region’s premier business school,” Huntley said.
 
The expansion will allow SVSU to grow its strong relationship with a regional business community already utilizing campus resources as well as the university’s determined and talented pool of business students, she said.
 
“This building — with its spectacular meeting spaces and collaborative learning spaces — can and will foster these collaborations, and position us well for additional partnerships,” Huntley said.
 
Anthony Bowrin, SVSU’s dean of the Carmona College of Business, called the expansion “a game changer” for the university and surrounding region.
 
“Our faculty and staff now have the resources to leverage our updated curriculum and innovative teaching approaches to enhance the preparation of our students,” he said. “This facility will better position students to realize their professional and personal goals while enhancing the pool of talent, insights, and ideas available to business and other organizations in the Great Lakes Bay Region.”
 
The Feb. 24 ceremony will feature presentations from legislators, business leaders and campus officials.
 
Student musicians with SVSU’s Cardinal Brass Quintet band will perform Monday as well.
 
The ceremony represents the first of two events scheduled next week aimed at introducing the public to the business college upgrade.
 
A Thursday, Feb. 27 event will allow the public to tour the new facility and attend SVSU faculty-led presentations on business-related subjects from 9:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. A keynote presentation by Nicholas Anderson, editor of Wired magazine, is scheduled at 7 p.m. that same day in SVSU’s Malcolm Field Theatre for Performing Arts.
 
SVSU Foundation earlier this week announced the completion of a $15.6 million fundraising campaign for the expansion. The building addition also was supported by $9.8 million in funding from the State of Michigan.
 
For more information about SVSU’s Carmona College of Business, visit www.svsu.edu/scottlcarmonacollegeofbusiness.

February 18, 2020

SVSU Board adds women’s lacrosse as varsity sport, grants tenure to 12 faculty

The Saginaw Valley State University Board of Control approved adding women’s lacrosse as a varsity sport, competing in NCAA Division II, during the Board’s regular meeting Monday, Feb. 17.

Lacrosse is the fastest-growing college sport in the nation, according to the NCAA, and it is increasingly popular in Michigan. Over the past three years, the number of high school girls lacrosse programs in the state has increased from 120 to 180. SVSU has offered lacrosse as a club sport since 2010. 

SVSU plans to start its intercollegiate women’s lacrosse program for the 2021-22 academic year and will compete in the Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (GLIAC), which currently has 6 schools competing in the sport. With the addition of lacrosse, SVSU will offer 9 men’s sports and 11 women’s sports.

Braddock Field at SVSU will be converted from natural grass to a synthetic turf surface as part of preparations to introduce women’s lacrosse; it will continue to be the home field for SVSU’s men’s and women’s soccer teams, as well.

The Board also granted tenure to 12 faculty members, effective July 1. They are:

  • Lisa Brewer, occupational therapy
  • Jill Brown, occupational therapy
  • Maribel Colorado-Garcia, Spanish
  • Rachel Darr, kinesiology
  • Samantha Deere, kinesiology
  • Micah DelVecchio, economics
  • Poonam Dharam, computer science
  • Cynthia Hupert, nursing
  • Matthew Mitchell, social work
  • Christine Noller, health sciences
  • Chatdanai Pongpatipat, marketing
  • Tina Thornton, nursing 

In other action, the Board:

  • approved the Board’s meeting schedule for 2020-21.
  • adopted revised Board of Control bylaws.
  • appointed a nominating committee for May Board elections.
  • requested conveyance of property and accepted obligations for Curtiss Hall. The bonds for the building, constructed in 1996, have been paid in full, and the State Building Authority has transferred ownership to SVSU.

February 18, 2020

Community backs SVSU business college expansion, providing $15.6M for fundraising campaign

The business community demonstrated its strong commitment to investing in the Great Lakes Bay Region’s future during a $15.6 million fundraising campaign supporting a building expansion expected to benefit generations of Saginaw Valley State University business students and grow regional businesses.
 
SVSU will host a dedication ceremony Monday, Feb. 24 for the $25.4 million, 38,500-square-foot addition to SVSU’s Scott L. Carmona College of Business.
 
The facility soon will be utilized by students and local business partners alike, providing them access to state-of-the-art facilities and technology fit for Fortune 500 companies. The investment in the future offered by those resources inspired donations — from alumni, friends of the university, local foundations and the business community — for SVSU’s “First for Business” campaign, helping the SVSU Foundation exceed its $15 million fundraising goal by $600,000. In total, 27 gifts topped $100,000.
 
“SVSU prides itself on serving as a resource for the region, and businesses are counting on us to develop both a deep talent pool of professionals as well as programs that can power those companies to success,” said Don Bachand, SVSU president.
 
“The overwhelmingly positive response from our business community and donors shows their faith in SVSU’s ability to deliver these resources. Our SVSU family is grateful for that faith, and we are excited to strengthen our partnerships with this new resource.”
 
The campaign’s largest gift was offered by the Scott Carmona family. Carmona, an SVSU alumnus and owner of Bay City-based Sunrise National Distributors, Inc., said the donation was a decision made by his family, including his wife, Nancy, and their two sons, Eric and Ryan.
 
“We are helping students achieve what they can achieve,” Scott Carmona said. “If they can achieve that with scholarships or a better facility or with more professors — and we are in a position to help them do that — then we are going to do that. If I can do my part to help, that’s what I’m going to do.”
 
Among the other business leaders who contributed to the campaign was Dick Garber, president of Garber Automotive Group. Garber said his contribution was inspired in part by the community-minded values that define SVSU business students.
 
“They come out with the understanding of the importance of people in industry today, and how important character is, which is a fundamental value of the university that coincides and complements what Garber is all about,” he said.
 
“They are a big part of the future of our business. To have our local university expand their business school: that is going to be attractive to local businesses and attractive to businesses outside the area. We help the university, we help our community, we help ourselves.”
 
Kimberly Norris, vice president of administration at Saginaw-based Glastender, Inc., served as co-chair of SVSU’s “First for Business” campaign as well as chair of the SVSU Foundation Board of Directors.
 
“We have strong leadership in the Great Lakes Bay Region who pull together to support what is best for our community,” said Norris, a two-time graduate of the university.
 
“SVSU has established a strong relationship with businesses in our community by demonstrating the desire to partner with us — whether it be to provide qualified graduates for our job openings or serving as a resource to us through programs like the Stevens Center for Family Business. It is clear that SVSU has made a commitment to us, and in return, business leaders gladly supported the Scott L. Carmona College of Business expansion project.”
 
Along with the fundraising campaign, the building addition was supported by $9.8 million in funding from the State of Michigan.
 
The expansion will create additional space to house the academic college’s classrooms, offices and business programs. The new space will include state-of-the-art technology such as analytics labs and Bloomberg Trading terminals, which tracks stock data in real time.
 
Planners say the upgrades will provide students with technology used by Fortune 500 companies, deepen connections between the business community and the talent pool developed at the university, along with establishing a business degree from SVSU as an industry gold standard.
 
“The success of this campaign was an incredible team effort by our Foundation board and volunteers,” said Andy Bethune, executive director of the SVSU Foundation.
 
“Our special thanks to campaign co-chairs Morrie Stevens Sr., Bill Zehnder and Kim Norris for their leadership. We could not have done this without them.”

February 18, 2020

SVSU student-musicians to showcase talents at Wednesday concert

Musical talent and skill will be on display in Saginaw Valley State University’s Rhea Miller Recital Hall on Wednesday, Feb. 19 at 7:30 p.m. during a recital featuring SVSU music majors.
 
This event is free and open to the public.
 
Five music majors will perform six musical pieces using vocals and a variety of instruments including trumpet, piano, guitar and euphonium.
 
Performing the song “Conversation” by Clare Grundman will be students Alessandra Dronch, of Fremont, on trumpet; and Jeremy Weaver, of Reese, on piano. Grundman has composed scores for film, radio, and television as well as several compositions for chamber ensemble and orchestra.
 
Seth Bearden, a baritone from Fife Lake, will be singing “Wick” from the 1991 Broadway musical, “The Secret Garden.”
 
Chelsey Diedrich, a mezzo soprano from Saginaw, will be singing “I Hate Men” from the 1948 Broadway musical, “Kiss Me, Kate.” Diedrich will be accompanied by Cheryl Cheger-Timmon on piano.
 
Jared Conner, of Otisville, on guitar will be performing a musical piece originally written for violin by 18th-century German composer Johann Sebastian Bach.
 
Conner will also be playing guitar for a performance of “Lágrima” by 19th-century Spanish composer Francisco Tárrega.
 
Mason Szagesh, of Vassar, will be playing the euphonium during a performance of “Exit the Foundry.”
 
For more information about the Wednesday recital, call SVSU's Department of Music at (989) 964-4159 or visit www.svsu.edu/music.

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