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About Us

Student Learning Goals

The English department’s mission statement lists the following as goals for our programs.

Students should be able to do the following:

  • write for a number of purposes;
  • read and interpret a variety of texts;
  • articulate relationships between texts and audiences;
  • meet the specific goals of the program they choose.

All SVSU Students Participate in the First Year Writing Program

First Year Writing Goals:

ENGL 111

The student who successfully completes English 111 will be able to:

  1. Use writing processes that develop exploratory drafts into revised prose for specific audiences, including the ability to:

a. Generate, select and focus writing topics

b. Plan, organize, and structure writing to develop a focus and purpose

c. Use specific and credible evidence to support positions in a convincing manner

d. Review, critique, revise

e. Edit writing to conform to the general conventions of Standard English.

2. Produce formal college-level essays that exhibit the requisite skills to attain a C level or better on the course rubric, which signals that a student is prepared to enter Communication Intensive courses and engage in academic discourse at the university level.

3. Conduct introductory library and other research, integrate facts and evidence from multiple sources, and document appropriately.

4. Read critically and analyze material written for multiple audiences and purposes.

5. Effectively participate in interactive/collaborative reading and writing activities.

ENGL 080

The student who successfully completes English 080 will be able to:

1. Use writing processes that develop exploratory drafts into revised prose for specific audiences, including the ability to:

a. Generate, select and focus writing topics

b. Plan, organize, and structure writing to develop a focus and purpose

c. Support positions in a manner convincing to targeted audiences

d. Review, critique, revise

e. Edit writing to conform to the general conventions of Standard English.

2. Produce formal college level essays that exhibit the requisite skills to attain a C level or better on the course rubric, which signals that a student is prepared to enter English 111 and engage in academic discourse at the university level.

3. Read critically and analyze material written for multiple audiences.

4. Effectively participate in interactive/collaborative reading and writing activities.

Learning Outcomes of English Majors

Creative Writing

  • Understanding of the methods and structures of several literary genres. In the realm of fiction, students should be able to construct believable and engaging characters, settings, dialogue, and theme. Students should also be able to match form with function. In the realm of poetry, students should be able to construct vivid imagery and theme, and select interesting and engaging language. Students should also be able to match form with function.
  • The ability to generate vivid imagery — both physical description and figurative language — which contributes structurally to their work and helps to create an imaginative experience for their readers.
  • Understanding of and ability to use skillfully voice, tone, and diction appropriate to the subject matter and goal of each piece.
  • A clear and correct sense of the mechanics of written English (grammar, syntax, punctuation, spelling).  Students should also demonstrate understanding of when to use standard English and when and how to use dialect, informal language or slang, whether in the narrative voice or in dialogue.
  • Fluency in invention and skill in revision — a sense of methods for getting started when they’re not “inspired” and a sense of how to self-critique, receive critique from colleagues, and revise.
  • The ability to make tactful and technically skillful contributions to the workshop process to aid fellow writers in evaluation and revision.
  • Experience reading a range of literary texts in different genres.

 

Literature Program

 

Graduates with an English major and a concentration in literature should be:

 

 

  • Strong interpreters of language and literature, able to discuss forms and functions of the written word.
  • Familiar with a range of literature in English from the Middle Ages to the present, and, in addition, have deeper knowledge of representative authors, themes, movements, and genres.
  • Able to write and speak effectively, using language professionally in discipline-specific contexts.
  • Able to participate in debates about concepts, such as author, canon, and period, that continue to engage English professionals.
  • Able to consider the ways in which literature calls on readers to reflect on their own subjectivities and cultural positions, as well as on questions of difference and on cultural positions other than their own.

 

English Major for Teacher Certification (B.A.)

 

Candidates in this program will be able to:

 

  •  Demonstrate knowledge of and skills in the use of the English language.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the practices of oral, visual, and written language.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of reading processes.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of different composing processes.
  • Discuss, interpret, and evaluate a wide range of literature, including representative print and non-print texts from various periods in American, British, and world literature, and representative texts by or about women, and by authors who represent the perspectives of diverse backgrounds of ethnicity and social class.
  • Discuss, interpret, and evaluate literature written for and about adolescents and young adults, including literature by traditional and contemporary authors who reflect diverse cultural experiences by gender, social class, and ethnicity, and literature by authors who produce texts in different forms (written, oral, and diverse media).
  • Explain and apply major traditions and approaches in literary theory and analysis.
  • Be active readers of literature able to approach new texts--whether from the established literary canon, from older or contemporary texts by diverse authors, or texts in a different form--with understanding and sensitivity.
  • Use their experience as readers, combined with their knowledge of reading and student development, in illustrating the value of providing scaffolds and “ways in” to literature that help their students enjoy and feel confident in reading and responding to texts.
  • Analyze the factors important in creating a supportive environment that allows students to develop as readers who can make meaning from texts.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the range and influence of print and non-print media and technology in contemporary culture.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of research theory and findings in English Language Arts.

TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) Certification

Candidates for this certification are expected to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of language as a system, including phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics and semantics, and support their students as they acquire English language and literacy in order to achieve in the content areas.
  • Understand and apply theories and research in language acquisition and development to support their students’ English language  learning.
  • Know, understand, and use major theories and research related to the nature and role of culture in their instruction. They must demonstrate understanding of how cultural groups and individual cultural identities affect language learning.
  • Know, understand, and apply concepts, research, and best practices to plan classroom instruction in a supportive learning environment for English language learners. They plan for multilevel classrooms with learners from diverse backgrounds using standards-based ESL/ EFL curriculum.   
  • Know, manage, and implement a variety of standards-based teaching strategies and techniques for developing and integrating English listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Candidates are prepared to teach through a variety of effective approaches that promote communicative language learning.\ 
  • Be familiar with a wide range of standards-based materials, resources, and technologies, and choose, adapt, and use them in effective ESL/ EFL instruction.
  • Be familiar with a variety of standards-based language proficiency instruments to show language growth and to inform their instruction. They demonstrate understanding of their uses for identification, placement, and reclassification of English language learners.
  • Know and use a variety of performance-based assessment tools and techniques to inform instruction in the classroom.   
  • Demonstrate understanding of various assessment issues as they affect English language learners.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of history, research, educational public policy, and current practice in the field of ESL teaching and apply this knowledge to inform teaching and learning.
  • Take advantage of professional growth opportunities and demonstrate the ability to build partnerships with colleagues and students’ families, and the community.

 

 

Accrediting/Certifying Body: English Education and ESL/TESOL programs work within state guidelines.

Professional Organizations/Standards that informed development of learning outcomes: The Modern Language Association, National Council of Teachers of English, Conference on College Composition and Communication, and Associated Writing Programs contribute importantly through guidelines and recommendations for programs.